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Look back at September books

We were so busy with the October new books and new book series that we've almost forgotten about your 2017 reading challenges! Here's a quick look back at your September books. We've noticed that the Halloween Bingo gave you a great reading kick -- great job guys!

 

Click the blog headers to go to the blog pages and read more from the fellow bloggers.

 

Darkly Dreaming Dexter - Jeff LindsayGood Omens - Terry Pratchett,Neil GaimanCareer of Evil - Robert Galbraith

For Halloween Bingo, I read quite a few more books than expected, and some are usually not my thing. Total of 17 books read. Some nice surprise there... continue reading

 

 

Truly by Mary BaloghThe Warlord Wants Forever by Kresley ColeThe Witch and the Dead by Heather Blake

Woooeeee, what a busy September! I must have gotten the arc bug because I accepted a good amount that had me busting my butt to stay ahead of the game. Add those in with my themed month books, trying to catch up on new releases, and Halloween Bingo and I've been reading my tail feather off... continue reading

 

 

Killer Party (A Tourist Trap Mystery) - Lynn CahoonSecrets in Death - J.D. RobbBrighton Belle - Sara Sheridan

The volunteer position I took on in June for my son's school PTO board is proving to be a full-time job and my reading suffered as a result. 10 books is the least amount of books I have read in any one month all year. A lot of what I did read was "meh" to "grit my teeth and bare it to get the square filled"; the four books attached to this post is the best of my reading this month... continue reading

 

 

A Messy, Beautiful Life - Sara Jade AlanPatsy Walker, A.K.A. Hellcat! Vol. 1: Hooked On A Feline (Patsy Walker, A.K.A. Hellcat! (2015-2017)) - Brittney Williams, Kate LethThe Book of Whispers - Kimberley Starr

This month has been okay-ish. But I'm okay with it, cause September just wasn't my month at all. I'm glad it's over. But this month brought me A Messy, Beautiful Life. A book that is going to be on my favorites list for a long time now... continue reading

 

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If you've missed September wrap ups by other BookLikes bloggers, have a look at the following posts, and feel invited to read and join :) If we haven't included your post link, let us know in the comment section below.

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#12 Follow Friday with book bloggers: 99 problems, and a book ain't one

 

Please welcome Tricia from 99 problems, and a book ain't one!

Follow Tricia's blog here: http://tballa04.booklikes.com/

 

When did your book love begin?

 

My love affair with books began when I was a child. We had this great used book store by my house and I remember riding my bike up to it frequently and finding so many great books. They used to do trade-ins too so once I was done reading I could go right back and trade them in for something new. Clearly before my book-hoarding days lol.

 

How did your blogging adventure start?

 

My blogging mostly started by discovering that there were actually places where reading enthusiasts could go just to talk about books! Before 2011 I had no idea book blogging was even a thing. Once I found out, I couldn't get enough of reading other people's thoughts on books they've read. From there it progressed pretty quickly, I started commenting and interacting with other bloggers and sharing my thoughts. So when my best friend suggested we start a blog together in 2012 I thought it would be a lot of fun and jumped right in!

 

Can you name three things that blogging changed in your life?

 

Absolutely! First and foremost, professionally I made a huge change almost 2 years ago and it all started with blogging. I reviewed an early copy of a book I received from NetGalley and ended up connecting with the author afterwards. We hit it off right away and after a few months of becoming fast friends she offered me a job. Somehow this hobby turned into an actual career, working with one of the things I love the most, BOOKS!

 

Secondly, the book community in general has been overwhelmingly amazing! In a world, especially now, where things are so turbulent and you see so many negative things floating around every day, the book community has always been so welcoming and supportive, and an all around very positive and refreshing place to be a part of. Booklikes people most especially! When I started blogging I never imagined I would connect with so many new people in ways that went beyond just our love of books. I honestly feel like I found MY PLACE because of blogging. Somewhere I just fit seamlessly, surrounded by kind, smart, truly wonderful people.

 

Lastly, I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the outrageous amount of incredible reads that I've found because of blogging! Whether it be from a fellow blogger’s glowing review or from an author or publisher wanting to share a new book with me. I mean it is just incredible all around! I never thought people would be approaching me asking ME to read their stories and share my thoughts. I've come across so many amazing stories that I otherwise likely would have not known about to even give a chance to, and that is 100% because of blogging.

 

What are you favorite genres? Why are they special?

 

I truly enjoy a good mix of everything, variety is the spice of life afterall! But Fantasy has always held a special place in my heart. The only limitation in Fantasy is imagination. I started out reading books like Matilda, The Indian in the Cupboard, Where the Sidewalk Ends, and it hasn't stopped there. It is a little bit of magic right in your hands, and if you ask me we could all use something fantastic in our lives once in awhile.

 

Matilda - Roald Dahl,Quentin BlakeThe Indian in the Cupboard - Lynne Reid BanksWhere the Sidewalk Ends - Shel Silverstein

 

You are an Official Blogger for Ozarks Indie Book Fest 2017. That sounds big, congrats! Can you tell us more about the event and your blog’s role.

 

Thank you! Ozarks Indie Book Fest is a wonderful book festival happening this October in Springfield, Missouri. Not only is it a fun-filled book festival bringing authors and readers together, it is also an event with a heart of gold and all the proceeds from the event are being donated to two amazing charities! Companions for Heroes, who provides companion animals obtained from shelters and/or rescues, who might otherwise be euthanized, free of charge to active duty military personnel, military veterans, and first-responders recovering from the psychological challenges they suffered during service to our country. As well as Loving Paws Animal Rescue, who works to maintain a no-kill animal rescue, bringing care and help to animals in need. You can find out more OIBF info here: http://ozarksindiebookfest.com

 

When I was first approached over a year ago by a fellow blogger, and a founder of OIBF, to be an official blogger for them I was honored and a little overwhelmed. I had never done anything like that before and I had never even attended a book festival before then. We talked a little more about what it would entail and it is an awesome event for a great cause so I had to join. As an official blogger for them I basically use my blog to help spread the word about the festival itself, as well as the charities, authors, sponsors, location, and events within the festival.

 

What are you three favorite book covers?

 

Oh man, that is a tough one, I love so many! I am totally over the moon for Laini Taylor’s Night of Cake and Puppets right now. Not only is the dust jacket gorgeous, but the naked hardcover is absolutely stunning as well. And I usually find myself removing the dust jackets when I read hardcovers so I really appreciate something so beautiful hiding underneath as well.

 

 

I also adore E.J. Mellow’s Dreamland series covers. They are so beautiful. The underwater shots with a woman in a gorgeous gown flowing around them, just so pretty with a hint of otherworldly at the same time.

 

Lastly, I love Lauren Bird Horowitz’s covers for Renegade Red! Yep, that's right covers, plural. Such a cool idea to show an extra piece of the story using 3 different covers, each representing something different and powerful happening within the story inside. And collecting them all is so rewarding for a book hoarder like myself!

 

 

You’re reviewed over 400 books on BookLikes. How do you write book reviews, do you make notes during reading or review ad hoc the day you finish the book?

 

Oh my! I actually had no idea how many reviews I've written here haha. I feel pretty good about 400+! Typically I prefer to just write a review all at once right after I finish. I feel like for me, if I write them right away it is very fresh in my mind and I tend to remember all the little details I want to include. Once in awhile if I'm reading on my kindle I will add a rogue note or two in there if something great jumps in my head in the moment, and I love the highlighting function, I use that constantly to help keep important things easy to look back up for the review.

 

 

Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers this fall?

 

When I think of fall I naturally think of Halloween and the supernatural. I love a good spooky story and this time of year, when your surroundings are so befitting of that spookiness, tis the season! Bring on the spine-tingling goodness!

 

One of my favorite series is the Experiment in Terror series by Karina Halle. Think Ghost Hunters in book form, with other supernatural creatures lurking about too. It is fun and frightening and the main character is so darn relatable, I just love it all!

 

Darkhouse - Karina HalleRed Fox - Karina HalleDead Sky Morning (Experiment in Terror) - Karina Halle

 

Also, I am a huge Stephen King fan and he has so much of his stuff coming to the big and little screen right now, It is already out in theaters and Gerald's Game and 1922 are coming to Netflix soon. I highly recommend reading the books before watching the movies/shows! And I don't know about you but I am pumped for Sleeping Beauties which he co-wrote with his son Owen. I pre-ordered that one as one of my extra Book of the Month picks next month.

 

It - Stephen KingGerald's Game - Stephen KingSleeping Beauties: A Novel - Stephen King,Owen King

 

What’s your favorite reading place? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

 

A picture really is worth a thousand words here! A few years ago for my birthday my handy dandy guy built me this magical reading nook in our spare room. I love curling up in there with my beagle and getting lost in a great book. 

 

Do read one or several books at a time?

 

Usually I only read one at a time. Although recently I have been trying to tackle the ever growing TBR mountain of books I own, so I've been reading a paperback/hardback by day and a kindle book at night. So basically book-batmaning. Is that a thing? Let's pretend it is for this ;)

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

Both. I love the experience of reading a physical book, the turning of the pages, the feel in your hands, even that special book smell! On the flip side, e-books are so convenient. You have a limitless library at the tip of your one-clicker and it is so easy to take them all with you wherever you go. Plus I love reading in bed at night, and e-readers are ideal for that. No booklights to constantly shift around and having to reposition the book 156,954 times because it is bulky and won't sit just right.

 

Three titles for your best friend?

 

Does this mean picking actual book titles for my best friend? This is awesome! In advance, I'm sorry we're weird.

 

How to be Inappropriate, Feelings and How to Destroy them, and The Zombie Survival Guide.

 

How to Be Inappropriate - Daniel NesterThe Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead - Max Brooks

 

Any friendship worth its salt has bore a zombie apocalypse discussion/plan...right?

 

Favorite quote?

 

Another tough one! This one is definitely a favorite and also something I believe in fiercely.

 

 

“Question everything. Your love, your religion, your passion.

If you don't have questions, you'll never find answers.”
Colleen Hoover, Slammed

 

If you could meet one author, who would it be?

 

Eeekk! So many! I guess I'd have to go with Stephen King though. His books were such a big part of my reading life throughout the years. I started reading King books as a kid and I haven't stopped yet!

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

My nook shelves <3

 

Thank you so much for including me in Follow Friday this week!

Thank you!

 

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Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

#11 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Book Cupidity [Nominated] ->

#10 Follow Friday with book bloggers: The Book Gourmet ->

 

You can nominate your blogger friends to the Follow Friday interview! Click here and leave the URL address in the comment section.

 

See you next Friday!

 

BookLikes How to: book search tips

 

Searching books isn't always a piece of cake, especially with a never-ending virtual bookshelf and a catalog with multiple editions. Jenn, to the rescue with some handy tips for all BookLikers! 

 

-- A guest post by Jenn, Murder by Death

 

The first and best way to find a title in the book database is to search by ISBN (or ASIN).  There are a couple of benefits to using ISBN for searching:  it will find the edition you have in your hand, and if it isn’t in the database, searching by ISBN/ASIN will kick off an import of the book, saving you all the work of having to either add it yourself, or asking a librarian to add it for you.

 

(Tip:  If you search by ISBN and multiple entries of the same title come up, let a librarian know by filing a book report.  That way they can merge the multiple records into one correct edition.)

 

Sometimes you don’t have the ISBN/ASIN handy, or the book is too old to have one.  Then it’s helpful to know a few tips about how to get the most out of BookLikes search.

 

Note: there are two search fields covered in today’s tips:  the BookLikes database, which is the field at the top right corner of the BookLikes pages, and the search field on your shelf page, which only searches the books you’ve shelved and has a different set of rules.

 

 

Searching the BookLikes book database

 

Generally, searching by title is very straightforward, especially for unusual titles, like The Maul and the Pear Tree, but the infinite variety of titles guarantees that some will work better than others without having to tweak how you search. 

 

Partial titles work. If they’re unusual enough.  So using The Maul and the Pear Tree, I can get away with searching The Maul and, although just searching The Maul is not enough: 

 

 

 

Articles A / An / The are optional:  UNLESS it’s a really common title.  So while The Wychford Poisoning Case and Wychford Poisoning Case will both return the book I’m looking for, if I try to search for A Shock to the System by Simon Brett, I’m better off including that A. 

 

 

 

 

Special characters:  The book database search is pretty forgiving overall (see note below) when it comes to &, apostrophes, commas, non-english alpha characters etc.  So searching for Mr. Pottermack’s Oversight will work as well as Mr Pottermacks Oversight, although the number of results returned might vary.    

 

 

 

Likewise, searching Jo Nesbø will return results for Jo Nesbo and vice versa.

 

(Note: there are some exceptions for non-english characters; when in doubt, try both.  This also holds true for the ampersand [&]; while I generally find it is interchangeable with ‘and’ there have been exceptions, so it’s always good to try both.)

 

 

When you’re getting too many results and none of them are the book you’re looking for.

 

Let’s say I’m looking for Ten by Gretchen McNeil. This is like searching ‘cats’ on google.  It’s too common a word and I’m going to get results that look like this:

 

 

 

Of course searching Ten Gretchen McNeil works, but generally the less typing, the better.  With that in mind, I tweak the search so that it says Ten Gretchen. Now I get:

 

 

Ten McNeil also works, but gives us two results. It’s always better to use the least common words when you have the choice to do so.  So if you’re trying to find a title that’s likely to return a lot of results, using part or all of the author’s name too will find your book faster.

 

 

Omnibuses are omnipresent

Because the BL database searches for all records that match the words you searched for, omnibus editions, if they exist, will appear in the results.  So searching for Murder on the Orient Express will return the single title edition as well as any omnibuses that include it as part of the title.   Most of the time the single edition title will appear at the top, but sometimes the omnibuses will overtake them and you’ll have to do a bit of scrolling.

 

 

PLEASE NOTE:  At the time of this writing, books that have been published under different titles in different countries and tied/combined together in the system can only be found by one of the titles (the ‘main’ one).  For example, Agatha Christie’s book Lord Edgware Dies was published in the US as Thirteen at Dinner.  As it’s the same book, they’re combined under Lord Edgware Dies.  This means that, at present, a search for Thirteen at Dinner only turns up omnibuses that contain that story.  This is a bug and it has been reported to BookLikes.  In the meantime, if you can’t find your book and you know of an alternate title, try searching by that title.

 

 

 

Searching your shelves

 

The search function for your shelves (the field that sits atop your shelves instead of at the top right of the page) is an entirely different beast from the book database search and can be summed up briefly:  This is an EXACT MATCH search function.  If a title has apostrophes, commas or any other special characters and you don’t include them, the search won’t find your books.

 

This means if I’m trying to find The Devil’s Novice by Ellis Peters on my shelves and I type in The Devils Novice (no apostrophe), it’s going to return zero results. 

 

How to get around this:  I either have to include all the punctuation in the title OR just search for a part of the title.  So searching Novice (or novice - it’s not case sensitive) will bring up my shelved book.  Other searches that will work include:  Devil (because it will search partial words), and Ellis Peters although these will return multiple results.

 

Note: you cannot use partial words combined with additional terms:  Devil Ellis or Devil Ellis Peters does NOT work; partial words must be used alone.

 

The best rule of thumb for searching your shelves is, unless you know the EXACT name of the book, stick to a few words of the title: Miss Peregrine instead of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children.  The shorter the search terms (while still keeping them effective) the smaller the margin of error.

 

Still not finding your book?

  1. Is it spelled right? It’s always worth double checking, as BL doesn’t have “did you mean” functionality.  If the book has been published under an alternate title and you know it, try searching by that title instead and then looking under “other editions” on the book page.
  2. Search by ISBN/ASIN: if it’s not in the system, it will be by the time the search finishes.
  3. If there’s no ISBN/ASIN on the book, try searching by author; sometimes a record will have the wrong language setting, keeping it from appearing in the results.
  4. Add the book. If it’s still nowhere to be found, please consider taking the time to add the book to the database so that it will be there when the next reader comes looking.

 

 

Have you had a particularly challenging time trying to find a book?  If so, please share it in the comments below; sometimes a title needs some special love from the librarians (bad imports leaving languages out, etc), or someone else might have a tip to make those searches work better.

 

Happy BookLiking!

#CoverLove: 7 October fantasy & sci-fi books judged by beautiful covers

October is a horror month but we simply had to mention the following fantasy and science fiction new releases. We know that books shouldn't be judged by the covers, but these cover arts really caught our eyes. SO BEAUTIFUL.

 

The Tiger's Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera The Tiger's Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera 

K Arsenault Rivera's debut, The Tiger's Daughter, the beginning of a new epic fantasy trilogy.

The Hokkaran empire has conquered every land within their bold reach—but failed to notice a lurking darkness festering within the people. Now, their border walls begin to crumble, and villages fall to demons swarming out of the forests.

Away on the silver steppes, the remaining tribes of nomadic Qorin retreat and protect their own, having bartered a treaty with the empire, exchanging inheritance through the dynasties. It is up to two young warriors, raised together across borders since their prophesied birth, to save the world from the encroaching demons.

This is the story of an infamous Qorin warrior, Barsalayaa Shefali, a spoiled divine warrior empress, O Shizuka, and a power that can reach through time and space to save a land from a truly insidious evil.

 

 

The Crow Garden by Alison LittlewoodThe Crow Garden by Alison Littlewood

Susan Hill meets Wilkie Collins in Alison Littlewood's latest chiller: mad-doctor Nathaniel is obsessed with the beautiful Mrs Harleston - but is she truly delusional? Or is she hiding secrets that should never be uncovered?

Haunted by his father's suicide, Nathaniel Kerner walks away from the highly prestigious life of a consultant to become a mad-doctor. He takes up a position at Crakethorne Asylum, but the proprietor is more interested in phrenology and his growing collection of skulls than the patients' minds. Nathaniel's only interesting case is Mrs Victoria Harleston: her husband accuses her of hysteria and delusions - but she accuses him of hiding secrets far more terrible.

Nathaniel is increasingly obsessed with Victoria, but when he has her mesmerised, there are unexpected results: Victoria starts hearing voices, the way she used to - her grandmother always claimed they came from beyond the grave - but it also unleashes her own powers of mesmerism . . . and a desperate need to escape.

Increasingly besotted, Nathaniel finds himself caught up in a world of séances and stage mesmerism in his bid to find Victoria and save her.

 

 

The Stone in the Skull by Elizabeth Bear The Stone in the Skull by Elizabeth Bear 

Hugo Award–winning author Elizabeth Bear returns to her critically acclaimed epic fantasy world of the Eternal Sky with a brand new trilogy.

The Stone in the Skull, the first volume in her new trilogy, takes readers over the dangerous mountain passes of the Steles of the Sky and south into the Lotus Kingdoms.

The Gage is a brass automaton created by a wizard of Messaline around the core of a human being. His wizard is long dead, and he works as a mercenary. He is carrying a message from a the most powerful sorcerer of Messaline to the Rajni of the Lotus Kingdom. With him is The Dead Man, a bitter survivor of the body guard of the deposed Uthman Caliphate, protecting the message and the Gage. They are friends, of a peculiar sort.

They are walking into a dynastic war between the rulers of the shattered bits of a once great Empire.

 

 

Above the Timberline by Gregory ManchessAbove the Timberline by Gregory Manchess

From renowned artist Gregory Manchess comes a lavishly painted novel about the son of a famed polar explorer searching for his stranded father, and a lost city buried under snow in an alternate future.
When it started to snow, it didn’t stop for 1,500 years. The Pole Shift that ancient climatologists talked about finally came, the topography was ripped apart and the weather of the world was changed—forever. Now the Earth is covered in snow, and to unknown depths in some places.
In this world, Wes Singleton leaves the academy in search of his father, the famed explorer Galen Singleton, who was searching for a lost city until Galen’s expedition was cut short after being sabotaged. But Wes believes his father is still alive somewhere above the timberline.

 

 

The Beautiful Ones by Silvia Moreno-GarciaThe Beautiful Ones by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

In a world of etiquette and polite masks, no one is who they seem to be.

Antonina Beaulieu is in the glittering city of Loisail for her first Grand Season, where she will attend balls and mingle among high society. Under the tutelage of the beautiful but cold Valerie Beaulieu she hopes to find a suitable husband. However, the haphazard manifestations of Nina’s telekinetic powers make her the subject of malicious gossip.

Yet dazzling telekinetic performer and outsider Hector Auvray sees Nina’s powers as a gift, and he teaches her how to hone and control them. As they spend more and more time together, Nina falls in love and believes she’s found the great romance that she’s always dreamt of. But Hector’s courtship of Nina is deceptive.

The Beautiful Ones is a sweeping fantasy of manners set in a world inspired by the belle époque.

 

 

Switchback by Melissa F. Olson Switchback by Melissa F. Olson 

The Bureau of Preternatural Investigations returns in Switchback, the sequel to Melissa F. Olson's Nightshades.

Three weeks after the events of Nightshades, things are finally beginning to settle for the Chicago branch of the BPI, but the brief respite from the horror of the previous few weeks was never destined to last.

The team gets a call from Switch Creek, WI, where a young man has been arrested on suspicion of being a shade.

The suspect is held overnight, pending DNA testing, but seemingly escapes in a terrifying and bloody massacre. But is there more to the jailbreak than a simple quest for freedom?

 

 

Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor 

Much-honored Nnedi Okorafor, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy awards, merges today’s Nigeria with a unique world she creates. Akata Warrior blends mythology, fantasy, history and magic into a compelling tale that will keep readers spellbound.

A year ago, Sunny Nwazue, an American-born girl Nigerian girl, was inducted into the secret Leopard Society. As she began to develop her magical powers, Sunny learned that she had been chosen to lead a dangerous mission to avert an apocalypse, brought about by the terrifying masquerade, Ekwensu. Now, stronger, feistier, and a bit older, Sunny is studying with her mentor Sugar Cream and struggling to unlock the secrets in her strange Nsibidi book.
Eventually, Sunny knows she must confront her destiny. With the support of her Leopard Society friends, Orlu, Chichi, and Sasha, and of her spirit face, Anyanwu, she will travel through worlds both visible and invisible to the mysteries town of Osisi, where she will fight a climactic battle to save humanity.

 

 

What are your October cover love picks?

 

For more October new releases read also:

 

#11 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Book Cupidity [Nominated]

 

[Nominated by BLoggers]

Wave to Courtnie from the Book Cupidity blog! Hello, Courtnie! Lovely to have you with us!

 

Follow Courtnie and her book blog Book Cupidity: http://c0urtnie.booklikes.com/

 

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Tell us about your first book love.

 

Such a tough question...I think I could come up with something sweet or poetic, but honestly I think my first lasting book love was Jericho Barrons. That whole series (Fever Series by Karen Marie Moning) just stuck with me for days and days after reading. Jericho Barrons was probably the first anti-hero I'd ever read and he was unabashedly amoral. He got under my skin, he made me think. And he was very good looking and owned a bookshop in Dublin. Who wouldn't be a lost cause to that?

 

What made you start writing about books?

 

Before I began book reviewing/book blogging, I remember that lonely, frustrated feeling of not being able to share how a book made me feel with people who 'got it'.  I wanted to talk about books with other people - writing about books seemed like the way to join the conversation.

 

Does book blogging have an impact on your book picks?

 

Yes! So much so. Being a part of a book blogging community, getting to know other bloggers and their tastes and vice versa, reading their blogs and reviews has moved me so much over the years. I've stretched and read things that I previously would have willingly passed - sometimes because someone loved it, sometimes because someone hated it! I'm horribly suggestible when it comes to books. Shameful really and my never ending to-be read list is proof.

 

 

You mention cookbooks on your blog. Can you recommend a perfect pairing of a yummy dish and a book to accompany it?

 

Well, it's fall. Around my house, fall means the return of chilling books and warming chili.

The Terror - Dan Simmons For a book I'd suggest The Terror by Dan Simmons because it will chill you to the bone. It's one part historical fiction and one part frigid psychological horror. The historical backbone is Franklin's lost expedition to the arctic. Two ships stranded in the icy wasteland for two years sounds bad enough but things really get sideways when men start disappearing and the Captain begins to wonder if something is stalking them on the ice. Very atmospheric and not to be rushed - let it simmer. Like chili in fact! Here's my recipe:

 
(This makes enough for a crowd, it also freezes well)
 
1 29oz can of Tomato Sauce (or large can)
1 15oz can of Tomato Sauce (or regular sized can)
1 15oz can of Diced Tomatoes
 
1 green pepper
1 onion
 
1.5lbs ground beef
 
3 cans of beans (I use a mix of kidney and pinto)
 
Seasoning:
1 tbsp + 1 tsp chili powder
2 tsp cumin
1 tbsp onion powder
1 tbsp garlic powder
1 scant tsp cayenne
1 heaping tsp dried basil
2 heaping tbsp flour
2 tsp sugar
 
Dice onion and green pepper, saute in coconut oil (or whatever cooking oil you prefer). I like to season with salt and pepper. Brown ground beef, drain. Mix seasoning ingredients and stir.  In large pot with a lid, combine veggies, tomato products, seasoning, beans and browned meat. Cover and simmer. The longer the better. If we have beer on hand, I almost always add a glug or two of beer to my chili because the hoppy nuttiness is yummy here. Sometimes a little brown sugar as well, to taste - depends on the flavor/acidic level of the canned tomatoes.

What are your three favorite book covers?

 

I really don't have three FAVORITE book covers, BUT I love a good romance cover and stepback. Sometimes because they are cheesy and perfect, sometimes because they're really pretty - occasionally they're very risque. All of them are like a little extra surprise. I like Eloisa James cover and stepback here for her book When Beauty Tamed the Beast, which is a favorite book of mine too.

 

 

Amanda Quick's books have great stepbacks. 

 

And lastly, I've always been in love with the artist who does the work for Patricia Briggs' covers. Dan dos Santos does really pretty work, in my opinion.

 

Your bookshelf looks very well organized, a lot of additional shelves tagged with the challenge years and author shelves etc. How does the shelving system help you in finding your next book to read?

 

I treat my shelves like a list of sorts. When I have a specific reading goal, shelving is an easy way to make a list at a glance. I've used author shelves specifically if I planned on reading their catalogue. It's helped me see at a glance what I have had left to read or what not. Sometimes I have other zany reasons to sort books out, but it's almost always used so that I can see where I've been to know where I'm going.

 

 

 

You’re in the middle of Halloween bingo. What are you reading right now?

 

My Halloween Bingo read right now is Mirror Image by Sandra Brown for Romantic Suspense - she's always good for impossibly over the top scenarios, a steamy romance and a quick pace. I'm also starting Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier with Murder by Death for the Gothic square, and I'm doing a buddy read of Mr Mercedes by Stephen King  for the Modern Masters of Horror square with a throwback bookliker and friend, Bookstooge.

 

Mr Mercedes - Stephen King

 

The Fall is a major new release time. Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers this season?

 

I keep up on precious few new releases, so we'll skip this one too :)

 

What’s your reading spot? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

My favorite reading spot is a funny question... right now, it's wherever I can find a little quiet. I have two very active boys who are 6 and 9 years old and family life is very hectic. I'm in a constant rush to get somewhere or do something or constantly dodging the neighborhood kids that invade my home. These days I find I do a lot of reading leaning against the kitchen counter while something is cooking or wherever I can land somewhat comfortably with bit of quiet. I've been known to sit on my basement steps waiting for the laundry to dry with a book in hand because no one was down there. :)

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

Both, at the same time of the same book! Maybe a little unconventional, but since I steal all my moments to read, having it in both formats is very, very handy. I read on my phone at the line in the bank and then finish the paper copy by my nightstand lamp light. I love this age we're in where I can have it all ways at my fingertips.

 

Do you read one or several books at a time?

 

I read several at a time. It's a habit I've grown into because I didn't start out that way - I used to be a girl who would read one book cover to cover devotedly. I've gotten a bit more loose as I've aged and like to cheat on one genre with another.

 

Favorite quote?

“I wish you to know that you have been the last dream of my soul.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
 
I will say though that the quote that I've returned to again and again in my life and have kept in my hip pocket is actually from Eleanor Roosevelt and is not a book quote (cheating here, I know) - "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent".  Eleanor's perseverance has always had an impact on me.

If you could ask one author out, who would it be?

 

Another tough one... I can easily list several favorite authors, but as far as one that I'd want to have a beer with and shoot the breeze? I think it would have to be Jim Butcher. Off the top of my head, I can come up with a half dozen topics of conversation that I'd be eager to hear him talk about. He was once from my neck of the woods and we would presumably have some things in common besides my love of his books, plus he just seems like an easy going, laid back, fun guy. I could name others, but I'm not sure I'd know what to say to many to make the experience worthwhile.

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

Confession time! I have absolutely no organization when it comes to my home library. We've not yet figured out a good system after having abandoned the alphabetical order thing that was a complete disaster. I am a bad bibliophile.

 

 

Thank you so much for the opportunity to share!

 

Thank you!

 

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Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

You can nominate your blogger friends to the Follow Friday interview! Click here and leave the URL address in the comment section.

 

See you next Friday!

Share your favorite quote: 50 most powerful quotes from literature

 

Thanks to quotes readers can peek into the book just like through the keyhole. Quotes are wise, touching, inspirational, they are also powerful. A quote may become a motto, a leader's pitch, a brand. Let's appreciate the words by sharing your favorite quotes.

 

If you're curious how to find quotes on your BookLikes Dashboard, make sure you choose one of the Dashboard view on the right. Choose "Quote" view and your Dash will presents quote posts from blogs you follow.

 

 

If you enjoy sharing quotes, use the Quote post -- then your writing will be published within a special quote template.

 

 

You can also add a blockquote in your text. Simply mark the words and click the quotation mark on the top border of the editor box and the quote will receive a central placing in your writing. You can switch on/off the blockquote option for the paragraph any time

 

Your Quotes

 

If you follow BookLikes blog you've noticed the Friday Follow Friday with book bloggers interviews where readers are asked to share their favorite quotes. If you've missed the reading, click here to catch up.

 

Charles William Eliot's quote picked by Jennifer's Books

 

Neil Gaiman quote picked by Momma Says to Read

 

Quote from Coraline - Neil Gaiman  picked by Silence in the library

 

Quote fromBlue Lightning by Ann Cleeves  published on Obsession with words blog.

 

C.S. Lewis' quote published on Obsidian Blue blog

 

 

The following graphics presents 50 Most Powerful Quotes From Literature prepared by Essay Writing. And what are your top book quotes?

 

Source: http://essaywritingserviceuk.co.uk/blog/50-most-powerful-quotes-literature

Fall into October book giveaways

Fall into Fall with these seven October giveaways. To read more details go the the giveaways page by clicking the covers and titles.

 

 

language: English

format: ebook

categories: Fantasy, YA, Romance, Historical Fiction, Paranormal, Fiction

A magical journey set in 16th century Italy.
Berka was raised by her hermit father in the wild, secluded from human society. At the dawn of her fifteenth summer she meets a faun, a being from a different realm. The two are instantly drawn to each other, but their secret meetings are soon disturbed by the arrival of a group of bandits. The threat intensifies when the group’s leader establishes an alliance with evil spirits from the underworld. Berka’s father comes up with an escape plan, but she doesn’t want to leave and so she finds another way to deal with the inevitable peril....
 
 
language: English
format: ebook
categories: Romance, Contemporary, Erotica, Chick lit, Action & Adventure, Crime
For readers 18+ years old
The first ever BookLikes giveaway hosted by Sai Marie! I'm excited to provide some lucky readers with a free ebook copy of my book, Simply Scarlet!
All her life she has possessed what would appear to be the perfect life but for Camille de Clervaux appearances are most certainly deceiving and when all she believes turns out to be a lie, she has no idea how to cope. Jeremiah St. Clair has had a life filled with chaos, fighting and loss. As a former Army Ranger turned UFC fighter, Jeremiah has little patience or tolerance for anything but his career but when his eyes fall upon Camille his desire to protect her becomes overwhelming...
 
language: English
format: paperback
categories: Romance, Historical Fiction
The Scot Beds His Wife is the next lush, captivating Victorian romance in the Victorian Rebels series by Kerrigan Byrne.  They’re rebels, scoundrels, and blackguards—dark, dashing men on the wrong side of the law. But for the women who love them, a hint of danger only makes the heart beat faster.  Gavin St. James, Earl of Thorne, is a notorious Highlander and an unrelenting Lothario who uses his slightly menacing charm to get what he wants—including too many women married to other men. But now, Gavin wants to put his shady past behind him...more or less. When a fiery lass who is the heiress to the land he wishes to possess drops into his lap, he sees a perfectly delicious opportunity...
 
language: English
format: audiobook
categories: Religion & Spiritual
On several occasions, I have been opportune to work closely with the author and have found out the he is a fine Christian, hardworking, a man of great honor and no wonder he is writing about the virtue honor.
He is very articulate and very good when it comes to the work of God. Honor is not giving but it is acquired through hard work and humility. The writer of this book tries to admonish his readers to always seek the honor from God rather than man. This is the biblical standard and it the one that a good Christian should seek after. Honor from men does not always last and it is always bedeviled with strings. It is only God that gives blessing without attaching strings to it...
 
language: English
format: ebook
categories: Fiction
Sam and Laura Job have the perfect life.
They have a wonderful marriage. Beautiful children. Two great careers. They have a beautiful house in the suburbs. The Jobs are bestowed with all the blessings modern life has to offer. Their life was idyllic until a moment of tragedy changed everything for them, forever.
 
language: English
format: audiobook
categories: Biographies & Memoir
Hilarious Children is a book full of true stories of real people's tales about funny and embarrassing children experiences. This book is great for anyone looking to laugh. You will laugh and may even say, "That happened to me."
 
language: English
format: paperback
categories: Children's Books

The story begins with a seed landing in a pretty garden where it begins to grow and eventually forms a little flower bud. But, the little flower bud becomes frightened of things she ‘hears on the wind’; such as the sun that might scorch her petals, the rain that might spoil them, the wind that might blow them away - so the flower doesn’t want to bloom. However, all flowers must bloom, and as the little flower bud opens her petals she overcomes her fears one by one.
 
A Dubious Crime - Gerald J KubickiA Dubious Crime by Gerald J Kubicki
language: English
format: ebook
categories: Action & Adventure
The morning starts out like a routine day for Colton Banyon. Except, the insanely jealous, Loni wants to come to the office and scope out the women that Banyon works with at Dewey & Beatem in Chicago. The entire Patel clan has gone to India to visit with relatives. Previne stays behind, at Banyon's request to inspect an archeological dig site in Las Vegas,. Then the unthinkable happens. There is an explosion at the dig site and Previne is left clinging to life. Her doctors say that she will never recover and they will turn off her life support equipment in three days. Banyon soon discovers that the explosion is no accident and is part of a heinous plot by someone who is just drumming up business...
 

Find more giveaways here ->

 
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Would you like to add your giveaway? Are you an author or a publisher?

 

Readers love books. Books love readers. Share you book love by giving the titles you love to other readers who haven't had a chance to read it yet.

 

The giveaway option is also great for the upcoming titles and brand new books.

 

Read our post Giveaways: win free books and give your titles away where we describe the giveaway process with a step by step instruction and tips.
If you wish to spread the word about your titles, make sure to read 4 ways to give a shout out to a beloved title where we present several BookLikes spots to make it stand out.
If you seek more author information, please contact Kate@booklikes.com
 

#10 Follow Friday with book bloggers: The Book Gourmet

Let's say Hello to the blogger from Slovenia!

You can follow The Book Gourmet here: http://thebookgourmet.booklikes.com/

 

 

When have you become passionate about books and reading?

 

Books have been an integral part of my life since I can remember. My mom claims to have read fairy tales during her pregnancy, and the shelves in my room were always filled with books (fairy tales, fables, children's literature). Then, in elementary school, I got my library card and haven’t stopped reading ever since.

 

What made you start writing about books?

 

I started writing reviews to keep track, to keep a record of what I read and what I thought about it in case I’ll be wondering about it in the near or distant future.

 

Did blogging have an impact on your reading life?

 

Not really. I simply love to read and I’d still do it, blog or not.

 

You’ve nearly finished your Reading Challenge goal of 200 books for 2017! WOW, congratulations! How much time do you send reading?

 

I’ll probably increase the goal once I reach it. ;) My time spent reading really depends on what’s happening in my life at a certain moment. While I was finishing my degree, I read a lot less than I did when school didn’t occupy my mind (and life). Now, that school is no longer in the picture, I read every day in the late afternoon or evening. But I cannot read while traveling, my mind is otherwise occupied then.

 

 

When have you discovered that Romance is your favorite genre? Why is that?

 

I didn’t grow up reading books in English and our library either had books my Slovenian authors (which I always found rather dark and tedious) or translations of older novels, mostly in the crime or mystery genre (Agatha Christie, Edgar Wallace...) There weren’t Mistress - Amanda Quick  any romance novels available to us, until a published decided that maybe Slovenians were actually ready to read this particular genre as well, and published the translation of Amanda Quick’s Mistress. That was over ten years ago. I was hooked immediately, I loved the voice, the style, the story...Then I discovered that reading an original is even better than a translation, and I was hooked.

 

I wouldn’t say that straight-up romance is my favorite genre, I’m more of a romantic suspense gal. I like my books to have a little bit of everything; drama, action, mystery, and a good romance to bring it all together.

 

What are your 3 favorite book covers?

 

I couldn’t say. I’ll admit that sometimes a cover will make me take a good look at a book, but I don’t really pay that much attention. After all, you cannot judge a book by its cover.

 

You’ve reviewed 1300 books on your BookLikes blog! How does you review process look like?

 

My review process is fairly simple: I read a book and I write a review. And I never start a new book without first writing a review of the previous one.

 

You admit that Fall is your favorite season. Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers this fall?

 

I’m not that good at recommendations, since every person has their own favorite genre and/or author, and I’m not really keeping up with release schedules...

I’ll just say, pick the book that suits your mood at the moment or, if you’re feeling adventurous, go with an unknown author.

I’m currently at the beginning of the In Death series by J.D. Robb and loving it, maybe fans of mystery/suspense could give that one a go.

 

Naked in Death - J.D. RobbGlory in Death - J.D. RobbImmortal in Death - J.D. Robb

 

What’s your favorite reading place? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

I don’t really have a favorite reading space. As long as I’m moderately comfortable and people leave me be, I’m happy.

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

I love “real” books, nothing beats the smell and sound of paper as it moves through your fingers. But e-books are more practical, especially if you don’t have lots of space.

 

Food&book pairing! Please choose a book that would perfectly fit your favorite dish.

 

Sorry, I have no answer. I don’t really have a favorite dish...But I have quite a few favorite books. ;)

 

 

Favorite quote?

 

The strongest steel is forged by the fires of hell.

(from the Dark Hunters books by Sherrilyn Kenyon)

 

If you could date one literary character, who would it be?

 

Do I really have to pick just one? It’s a tie for the top spot between Alexander Cameron (from The Pride of Lions and The Blood of Roses by Marsha Canham) and Hawke (from Kiss of Snow by Nalini Singh), but I have many book boyfriends.

 

The Pride of Lions - Marsha CanhamThe Blood of Roses - Marsha CanhamKiss of Snow - Nalini Singh

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

 

Thank you!

 

 

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Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

 

You can nominate your blogger friends to the Follow Friday interview! Click here and leave the URL address in the comment section.

 

See you next Friday!

 

Read & review book series: October books & how to review several books in a single post

Once we start reading a book series we have to read till the end, and we must admit that waiting for another book in the series to be released is a true nightmare! WHAT? Another year!!! But when it's finally out, oh, it feels like Christmas and New Year's Eve with all the goodies and fireworks!

 

Here are some of the October book series next installments and a way to review them in a single blog post. Enjoy and let as know what book series are you reading?

 

Nemesis - Don Bartlett,Jo NesbøThe Scandalous Flirt (Cinderella Sisterhood Series) - Olivia DrakeOrigin - Dan Brown

 

Ringer - Lauren OliverLa Belle Sauvage - Philip PullmanHello Again (Dr. Evelyn Talbot Novels) - Brenda Novak

 

The Scot Beds His Wife (Victorian Rebels) - Kerrigan ByrneTwo Kinds of Truth - Michael ConnellyWhat the Hell Did I Just Read: A Novel of Cosmic Horror - David Wong,Stephen R. Thorne,Audible Studios

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Write about a book series in a single blog post

 

One book post is quick and easy.

 

Click Text, search the title on the wooden bar, select review stars, add your text and voila!

 

 

Your book review is ready, the big cover is auto attached on the left with the text wrapping, review stars visible on the right. The following snapshot presents the public blog view:

 

 

 

Writing about the book series isn't much longer, apart from the reading process of course. To review a book series click text and use as many book spots on the wooden bar as you want (the + for another titles will appear automatically).

You can add up to 10 titles in one post, it's not perfect but it's enough for the majority of the book series out there.

 

 

The following graphic shows the blog view, all covers are put above the text, the review stars on the right.

 

 

Do you prefer reviewing a single book or the book series?

 

Happy reviewing!

 

Book bloggers read banned books [#BannedBooksWeek]

BookLikes blogger at Bookish Blerd presents the top 10 challenged books of the last year and we had to share. Words have power!

 

A book is challenged when someone requests it to be removed from a library or notifies that access to a given title should be restricted. The OIF (the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom) each year shares a list of the top 10 most challenged books in the schools and libraries.

 

Here's a list of the top 10 of 2016 with a reason why it has been reported and banned.

 

 

This One Summer - Mariko Tamaki,Jillian Tamaki This One Summer - Mariko Tamaki, Jillian Tamaki  

Challenged because it includes LGBTQ characters, drug use, and profanity and was considered sexually explicit with mature themes.

 

Review :

I loved the artwork in this graphic novel; the portrayal of the characters all seemed so real. I especially loved the rendition of Windy, which perfectly captured that pudgy, just-before-puberty, before-you-start-to-get-self-conscious stage. Most of the story surrounds the dynamic between Windy and her friend Rose, who is maybe a year or two older than her... continue reading on A Reading Vocation blog ->

 

Drama - Raina Telgemeier Drama - Raina Telgemeier  

Challenged because it includes LGBTQ characters, was deemed sexually explicit, and was considered to have an offensive political viewpoint.

 

Review :

I see now why Raina Telgemeier has such a devoted fanbase. Drama was a great deal of fun and brought back a lot of fond memories of my own drama club experiences. Callie is in 7th grade and passionate about set design for her middle school's productions. Being of the age when you're drowning in a sea of hormones she spends a lot of her energy on thinking about certain cute guys in school and the chances she takes with those crushes don't always pan out the way she'd hope... continue reading on Books Read, Not Necessarily Well blog->

 

 

George - Alex Gino George - Alex Gino  

Challenged because it includes a transgender child, and the “sexuality was not appropriate at elementary levels.”

 

Review :

This is a touching story about a child trying to get people to accept her for who she is. Her struggle is presented in an age-appropriate way that while difficult at times, remains hopeful. The reason I became interested in this book is because a third-grade teacher at school was complaining about it. She didn't like that one of the students in her class was reading it. She came into the library to ask if we had the book and to point out that she thought it was inappropriate for third-graders. I looked into it and School Library Journal recommends it to grades 4-6, Kirkus Reviews says ages 9-12 and Publishers Weekly says ages 8-12. The student got the book from home so it wasn't really an issue. I am glad I read the book... continue reading on Reading is my ESCAPE from Reality! blog ->

 

 

I Am Jazz - Jessica Herthel I Am Jazz - Jessica Herthel  

 

Challenged because it portrays a transgender child and because of language, sex education, and offensive viewpoints.

 

Review :

I Am Jazz is a book that follows the story of a transgender girl (an individual born genetically as a male). This book is kid-friendly, stressing the importance of acceptance of all individuals no matter their back story. Because this book follows Jazz through her issues at school and also troubles with herself, this book is great for a classroom that might experience a child who is transgender. I would say this book would be great for any elementary school child... continue reading on Lit Block Book Blog ->

 

 

Two Boys Kissing - David Levithan Two Boys Kissing - David Levithan  

Challenged because its cover has an image of two boys kissing, and it was considered to include sexually explicit LGBTQ content.

 

Review :

This is an amazing inside look at the struggles of being gay in the past and present. The narrator is the collective voice of the gay generation during the AIDS epidemic. The storyline follows a cast of several gay teens in different walks of life during the age of the internet... continue reading on Fangirl Moments and My Two Cents blog ->

 

 

Looking for Alaska - John Green Looking for Alaska - John Green  

Challenged for a sexually explicit scene that may lead students to “sexual experimentation.”

 

Review :

I finished this book this morning on the way to work. I don’t know why I like the book. Probably because it’s everything I wanted to experience as a teenager but never had the guts to. This book gave me my teenage years back and I liked it. Sure, the story is sad and the second half of the book plays out as some sort of teenage crisis but I feel as if I can relate to the characters. That’s what we want from a good book, to feel the characters as if they were real. No one is perfect and that’s what I liked from the character Pudge... continue reading on the AMAITKEN.COM Book Reviews blog ->

 

Big Hard Sex Criminals - Matt Fraction,Chip Zdarsky,Chip Zdarsky Big Hard Sex Criminals - Matt Fraction, Chip Zdarsky

Challenged because it was considered sexually explicit.

 

About the book:

Suzie's just a regular gal with an irregular gift: when she has sex, she stops time. One day she meets Jon and it turns out he has the same ability. And sooner or later they get around to using their gifts to do what we'd ALL do: rob a couple banks... continue reading->

 

Make Something Up: Stories You Can't Unread - Chuck Palahniuk Make Something Up: Stories You Can't Unread - Chuck Palahniuk  

Challenged for profanity, sexual explicitness, and being “disgusting and all around offensive.”

 

Review :

I have a love/hate relationship with Chuck Palahniuk. I love him because he can somehow get away with writing the most offensive, politically incorrect, disgusting fiction ever. I hate him because I don’t feel smart enough to read his work. Somehow, I always have the feeling that he’s laughing at me...continue reading on the Read All The Things! Reviews blog->

 

 

The Meanest Thing To Say: A Little Bill Book for Beginning Readers, Level 3 - Bill Cosby,Varnette P. Honeywood,Varnette Hon Eywood The Meanest Thing To Say: A Little Bill Book for Beginning Readers - Bill Cosby

Challenged because of criminal sexual allegations against the author.

 

Review :

This one also had a good meaning behind it. No one has to submit to peer pressure, especially when it's being mean to each other. There are alternative paths to take, and those paths may change the way other people think as well... continue reading on a I'm A Book Shark blog ->

 

Eleanor & Park - Rainbow Rowell Eleanor & Park - Rainbow Rowell  

Challenged for offensive language.

 

Review :

I thought this novel was phenomenal. This novel is told in alternating chapters by Eleanor and Park. Both of these characters are two 16 year old teenagers living in Omaha in the 1980s. Park has an American father and Korean mother and except for those things comes from a home that could rival the Cleaver family at times. Park does his best to stay out of firing range from the cool kids on his bus. Feeling like a disappointment to his father and not very interested in girls he just likes to listen to music and read his comic books. Eleanor comes from a broken home and is finally after a year long absence allowed to return home to live with her mother... continue reading on Obsidian Blue blog ->

 

 

Keep on reading!

7 YA books of the week Sept. 25 - Sept. 30 [new releases]

 

September is almost gone but new books are popping up. Don't miss the Young Adult new releases of the last days of September!

 

The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic - Leigh Bardugo,Sara Kipin The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic by Leigh Bardugo

Young Adult, Fantasy,

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid's voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy's bidding but only for a terrible price.
Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.
Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange... read more

 

Invictus - Ryan Graudin Invictus by Ryan Graudin  

Young Adult, Science fiction, Time travel

Farway Gaius McCarthy was born outside of time. The son of a time-traveling Recorder from 2354 AD and a gladiator living in Rome in 95 AD, Far's birth defies the laws of nature. Exploring history himself is all he's ever wanted, and after failing his final time-traveling exam, Far takes a position commanding a ship with a crew of his friends as part of a black market operation to steal valuables from the past.
But during a heist on the sinking Titanic, Far meets a mysterious girl who always seems to be one step ahead of him... read more

 

Carry Me Home - Jessica Therrien Carry Me Home by Jessica Therrien

Young Adult, Inspired by a true story

Lucy and Ruth are country girls from a broken home. When they move to the city with their mother, leaving behind their family ranch and dead-beat father, Lucy unravels.
They run to their grandparents’ place, a trailer park mobile home in the barrio of San Jose. Lucy’s barrio friends have changed since her last visit. They’ve joined a gang called VC. They teach her to fight, to shank, to beat a person unconscious and play with guns. When things get too heavy, and lives are at stake, the three girls head for LA seeking a better life.
But trouble always follows Lucy. She befriends the wrong people, members of another gang, and every bad choice
...read more

 

House of Ash - Hope Cook House of Ash by Hope Cook  

Young Adult, Fantasy, Horror

 

After hearing voices among an eerie copse of trees in the woods, seventeen-year-old Curtis must confront his worst fear: that he has inherited his father’s mental illness. A desperate search for answers leads him to discover Gravenhearst, a labyrinth mansion that burned down in 1894. When he locks eyes with a steely Victorian girl in a forgotten mirror, he’s sure she’s one of the fire’s victims. If he can unravel the mystery, he can save his sanity . . . and possibly the girl who haunts his dreams. But more than 100 years in the past, the girl in the mirror is fighting her own battles... read more

 

Starfish - Akemi Dawn Bowman Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman  

Young Adult, Family, Health

Kiko Himura has always had a hard time saying exactly what she’s thinking. With a mother who makes her feel unremarkable and a half-Japanese heritage she doesn’t quite understand, Kiko prefers to keep her head down, certain that once she makes it into her dream art school, Prism, her real life will begin.
But then Kiko doesn’t get into Prism, at the same time her abusive uncle moves back in with her family. So when she receives an invitation from her childhood friend to leave her small town and tour art schools on the west coast, Kiko jumps at the opportunity in spite of the anxieties and fears that attempt to hold her back.. read more

 

Savage (Dragonrider Legacy 1) - Nicole Conway Savage (Dragonrider Legacy 1) by Nicole Conway

Young Adult, Fantasy

Forty years have passed since Jaevid Broadfeather brought peace to Maldobar and Luntharda. But that fragile truce will be tested as darkness gathers on the horizon. The vicious armies of the Tibran Empire have crossed the far seas and are threatening to destroy Maldobar completely. Not even the dragonriders can match the Tibran war machines. And after an attempt to awaken Jaevid from his divine sleep fails, the fate of Maldobar is looking grim.
Reigh has never known what it means to be a normal human. Raised amongst the gray elves in the wild jungle of Luntharda, he’s tried everything to fit in. But the dark power within him is bursting at the seams... read more

 

The Fire Queen (The Hundredth Queen Series) - Emily R. King The Fire Queen (The Hundredth Queen Series) by Emily R. King  

Young Adult, Fantasy

Though the tyrant rajah she was forced to marry is dead, Kalinda’s troubles are far from over. A warlord has invaded the imperial city, and now she’s in exile. But she isn’t alone. Kalinda has the allegiance of Captain Deven Naik, her guard and beloved, imprisoned for treason and stripped of command. With the empire at war, their best hope is to find Prince Ashwin, the rajah’s son, who has promised Deven’s freedom on one condition: that Kalinda will fight and defeat three formidable opponents.

But as Kalinda’s tournament strengths are once again challenged, so too is her relationship with Deven. While Deven fears her powers, Ashwin reveres them—as well as the courageous woman who wields them... read more

 

Happy Reading!

#9 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Midu Reads [Nominated]

[Nominated by BLoggers]

Let's welcome Midu in Follow Friday talks!

 

Have a look what Midu Reads on BookLikes: http://miduhadi.booklikes.com/

 

 

On your About me page you write that it was Lorna Doone that made you passionate about books. Tell us more.

 

Lorna Doone - R.D. Blackmore  There was this book fair at my school and I wanted to buy all the flashy books at exorbitant costs. Back then, my mom used to teach there as well. We have never been rich but our financial situation was even tougher then. I asked my mom if I could buy some books and she said, she would pick out a few for me. The next day, she returned with this boring book with the least glamorous subject matter and the most unattractive cover. Lets just say, I didn't receive the gift with much grace. She sat me down and told me to give the book a try anyway. I did and as I read, I fell in love with the story. I have never stopped reading after that.  

 

What made you start book blogging?

 

I wanted to be able to say more than "I've read this book", "This book is world-rocking/meh", or "Read this one or I'm writing you out of my will".

 

Does blogging have an impact on your reading life?

 

I would say, it has. My reviews have gotten more reader-centric. They used to be about me, now I try to write reviews that will also help others decide if a book is right for them. Consequently while reading, I also focus on things that would clinch (or be a deal breaker) to others.

 

What are you favorite genres? Why are they special?

 

I think I will always have a soft spot in my heart for Epic Fantasy. Yet now I find myself gravitating towards Sci-Fi. What makes it special is that I am able to relate with what I have read. It has given me a way to include science in my writing!

 

You’re an editor and a copywriter. You’re co-working with authors and other personalities from the publishing branch. How did that influence your reading life?

 

I think it has affected my writing life more. Before I ghost-wrote whole books, I didn't believe I would ever be able to write one for myself. Now, I have started thinking that might be...probably...is mostly possible lol

 

What are your three favorite book covers?

 

I love all the covers in the series, House of Comarré and The Dinosaur Lords.

Blood Rights - Kristen PainterThe Dinosaur Lords - Victor Milán

 

You’ve published over 300 reviews here on BookLikes. How does you review process look like?

 

I have? Wow! I keep two things in mind while writing a review: a) the characters or their actions do not make the author b) I should be able to justify any claims that I make in it. I hope I have done well in those regards :-)

 

 

Any tips for the beginner reviewers and bloggers?

 

Keep reading!

 

You’re an author! Tell us more!

 

I have written several short stories. One of them was published by the Antarctica Journal while others can be found on Smashwords and Medium.

Life Of A 'prayer - Midu HadiMr. Bear - Midu Hadi

 

Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers this fall?

 

I don't know how to do the seasonal thing or read the latest books. I read what I know I'd like reading at a particular time. The best I can do is name some good books that I have read recently include Binti by Nnedi Okorafor, Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card, and Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson. I am also loving my current read, The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd.

 

Binti - Nnedi OkoraforSpeaker for the Dead - Orson Scott Card

Ms. Marvel Volume 1: No Normal - G. Willow Wilson,Adrian AlphonaThe Invention of Wings: A Novel - Sue Monk Kidd

 

What’s your reading spot? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

I usually read when I am in the van and on my way to work. So, no photos!

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

Both. It just needs to be legible lol

 

 

Three titles for a dessert island?

 

I am going to mention my favorite authors, instead. So, anything by Mary Shelley, Georgette Heyer, and Steven Erikson.

 

Favorite quote?

 

They keep changing. I think this would be a good one to mention here:

That's the funny thing about old hurts- they just wait for new heartache to come along and then show up, just as sharp and horrible as the first day you woke up with the world changed all around you.

Lilith Saintcrow, Strange Angels

 

If you could meet one literary character, who would it be?

 

I would be most interested in meeting Catherine Earnshaw from Wuthering Heights. She is all kinds of evil!

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

 

Thank you!

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Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

 

You can nominate your blogger friends to the Follow Friday interview! Click here and leave the URL address in the comment section.

 

See you next Friday!

BookLikes How-to: How to Edit the Book Catalog / E-mail notifications note

BookLikes is a blog platform dedicated to book lovers but it's also an open book catalog which shares author pages and book records of the already published titles, the new releases and the upcoming books. Any BookLikes' member can search the catalog, add a new book record, edit the existing one and update the author page.

 

The group of BookLikes Librarians takes care of the catalog and watches on the accuracy of the data and works really hard to keep it well organized and lucid. Today, we've asked two of them to share some core tips on editing the book records. Read on and keep on editing.

 

Thank you so much, BookLikes Librarians! Keep up the great work!

 

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A guest post by Libromancer's Apprentice & Murder by Death

 

Parts of a Record

 

Cover:

Cover should match the edition/ISBN/ASIN - and that’s what we’ll check against.  Make sure you include a valid source code (or “book in hand” or “owned book”) when you are trying to change a cover:  missing/invalid sources will cause the edit to be rejected.

 

If you think your cover is one of several correct covers for an edition, please file a book report instead of a book edit, with a note that it’s an alternate cover for that edition. Include the URL to the cover you added too, please.

 

When covers do NOT need a source:

  • If you’re adding a cover to a book that has NO cover (green box)
  • You’re replacing a bad quality image with the SAME image at higher quality
  • You’re replacing a ‘cover coming soon’ placeholder

 

Covers can be .jpg, .gif or .png but must not exceed 250mb in size.

 

Title:

We want *just* the title and subtitles for books.  Series title should go in the Series Field.  As a general rule, there should be nothing in the title field within a set of parentheses.

 

For Graphic Novels we have to bend the rules a little due to their serial nature… and multiple systems of collecting issues. Please still fill out the series field as appropriate.

For comic books that have multiple different series under the exact same name (particularly superhero comics), the years of that series are used to designate the difference between the distinct runs.  So you may have “[Series Title] (YEAR-YEAR).

 

Where it gets a bit sticky is for Graphic Novels we want you to keep the series title in the title (we know!  We just told you not to do this for records)!  This is because the series title in this case is most often a very integral part of the volume title.

 

Example: The Wicked + the Divine, Vol. 1: the Faust Act

 

“The Faust Act” on it’s own is not the proper title, so we include the series.  Note, we used “Vol.” instead of “Volume” because the abbreviation is inclusive of the full word.

 

We don’t have a perfect solution for single issues of comic books yet, since they have UPCs instead of ISBNs (though, digital versions often have ASINs).  For single issues, use #[Issue Number] in the title.

 

Author:

Enter the author name, then wait - the database will search for records that match that name and return a list of three results. Choose the one that matches the book’s author. 

 

If search returns “no results” - please check the spelling of the author’s name carefully: if it is spelled correctly, hit “enter” to create a new record.  (There have been reports that this doesn’t work for non-librarians, if you find it didn’t assign the book to the proper author, flag the new book as ‘wrong author’ and note the correct name in the report.)

 

If search returns multiple results:  if your author has a name that is likely to be unique (i.e. J.K. Rowling, or Jo Nesbo), and the search returns multiple results, it’s an indication that there are author records that need to be merged.  Choose the author record at the top of the search results, and after saving the record, please flag us and let us know there are author records that need to be merged.

 

Author records should NOT have titles or qualifications:  for example:

  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - WRONG
  • Arthur Conan Doyle - CORRECT

 

(No Sir, Dr., Mr., Mrs., Dames, etc.)

 

  • Kathy Reichs, M.D., PhD, D.A.B.F.A. - WRONG
  • Kathy Reichs - CORRECT

 

(No MDs, PhDs or Jr., Sr, etc.)

 

If you are adding narrators, translators, etc. please be sure to label them accordingly; this will make the sort by author function on people’s shelves work a little bit more accurately.

 

What are these other roles?

  • Author: whoever wrote the work, or a significant part of the work.
  • Narrator: The performer of the work, such as in an audio book.
  • Translator: Translated the author’s writing into a different language.
  • Illustrator: an artist for the work.
  • Editor: did not write the work, but shaped it, such as the editor of an anthology.
  • Contributor: someone who added to the work in some other way, such as writing the Foreward.

 

Series:

Type in the series, and wait a second to let it try and find matches.  If it does find a match, select that series.  If it doesn’t, hit Enter/Return on your keyboard to add the Series.

 

 

Position in Series:

The system will accept whole numbers and decimals  (ex. 0.5, or 3.5).  Please do NOT include multiple series’ numbers.  If a book is part of multiple series, choose the main series, and assign it the appropriate place in that series.

 

What is a series:  multiple books with the same cast of characters, set in the same universe with a continuing or evolving progression. Progression is the key word: Sherlock Holmes is NOT a series; the stories were published without any timeline continuity.  Each story acts as a complete stand-alone and can be read in any order.  

 

What is NOT a series: Publisher imprints (Harlequin for example), that publish stand alone books, but number them within the imprints printing history.

 

There’s no ISBN/ASIN yet checkbox:

Only use this checkbox if your book is pre-1970’s or is scheduled to be published in the future, if the book is online-only, or fanfic.  In all cases, a valid source code must be included at the bottom of the edit page.

 

ISBN/ASIN:

Generally an either/or situation, with ASIN’s applying to Kindle books and Audible audiobooks.

However, there is a known bug that will sometimes mark valid ASINs as invalid, so at this time we are *not* splitting off combined ebook and Kindle editions.

 

If you need to edit a record and it doesn’t like the valid ASIN included, Librarians are recommending that non-Librarians remove the ASIN and submit the edit.  We check the record when ISBNs and ASINs are removed in an edit, and can specifically not approve that part of the edit.

 

ASINs are always a combination of letters and numbers - so if you see a string of just numerals, that can be cleared right now.  Similarly, ISBNs are only numeric (though you will see the occasional ISBN 10 ending with an “X”), so if you see something in an ISBN field that’s a mix, that needs to be fixed!  Also, an ASIN and ISBN should never be identical, if they are listed as such, one of them needs correcting!

 

Records with invalid (or missing both altogether) ISBNs/ASINs need to be merged.

 

Publisher:

Start out by typing in the publisher name, it should then generate a drop down list of options, sometimes with duplicates or odd one-off variations.  Please choose the “cleanest” version if there are duplicates (for example, a lot of them have dates after the name - avoid those if you can).

 

Librarians can’t remove or merge duplicates or one-off variations of publisher names, but we do submit them to the BookLikes staff for handling.

 

Date Published:

Date published for that edition, at least the year, more if you have it.

 

Format:

For the most part, format should be relatively straightforward, such as with a hardcover or paperback, but there are some areas, especially with digital formats, that may trip you up.

 

For digital items:

  • If your record has an ASIN choose “kindle”
  • If your record has an ISBN choose “ebook”
  • If you have a digital audio file, choose “audiobook”
  • If it’s fanfiction or a online only digital short, choose “online only”

 

Special physical formats:

  • “Library Binding” is generally a third party publisher rebinding and selling a softcover book or a collection of serial publications together with a hardcover.  One example is the company PawPrints that does this with children's books, and if you look at the page with the publication and Library of Congress information the ISBN will be different than the ISBN on the back cover barcode.
  • “MP3 CD” is a specific type of book-on-cd, where 10+ hrs of listening are on a single disc.

 

 

Description:

 

Book synopsis only please - do not include author plugs, or sale information, or series information in this field.

 

Genre:

 

This is optional, but please try to limit it to four genre tags; this may not always be possible, but it keeps the book record easy to read.   Note that if you search genres for “suspense”, books that are also “romantic suspense” will come up too, so there is no need to assign “romance” and “suspense” and “romantic suspense”  to a book.  

 

 

Duplicate Records

 

What qualifies as a Duplicate?

 

The obvious stuff:

  • Books with duplicate ISBNs
  • Books with duplicate ASINs

 

The not-so-obvious stuff:

  • Older pre-ISBN editions - do they have the same publisher and/or publish date?

 

If a record has any of the above, or lacks so much information that it is impossible to tell which physical book it’s a record of, it will get merged. Bare minimum for disambiguation is:

  • Title
  • Author
  • Publisher
  • Publish Date

 

The important thing here is that if a book has a different valid ISBN or ASIN, it is not a Duplicate, which leads us to...

 

 

New Book vs New Editions

 

If you have a book that you can find the title and author but not a record that matches on ISBN/ASIN, you can “Add New Edition” from the existing book page. This ties your book record to the other versions of the same book.

 

Sometimes a book isn’t in our system at all, and that’s when it’s time to add a New Book. Before that stage, try the search a few ways first, just in case something has changed between our initial record import and the publication in hand.  For example, sometimes authors change titles.

-Search by ISBN or ASIN

-Try altering your title search slightly to include all or a portion of the author’s name.  So if you search: The Scandal of It all and come up with nothing, try:  The Scandal of It all Jordan, OR:   The Scandal of it all Sophie.

 

 

Bad book records:  How to spot them

 

If you open a book on your shelves and think it might be a ‘bad one’ here are some things to look for:

 

Does the title have random brackets, extra words, or really really funky punctuation?

 

Does it have an author?  -  Some imports came through with corrupted author fields, leaving these records with blank or empty authors

 

When you’re looking at the book page, can you see any other books by that author listed on the right?  Does anyone else have that book shelved (also listed on the right)?  These aren’t always 100% accurate indications of a bad record, but they can often be a big indicator - if you click on your edition of Pet Cemetery and it’s not displaying any other Stephen King books, or it looks like you’re the only person on BookLikes who has read it, it’s a bad record.

 

Can you see a language?  ALL records must have a language assigned to them and you can see it in the block of information on each book page.  Like the bad author imports I mentioned above, some imports brought in records without any language assigned. These records will not appear in searches at all, and need to be corrected.

 

Is it an empty record - does it have nothing save the title and author?  For most books, that means that even if it’s not a bad record, it probably has a much better defined twin in the database somewhere, (unless you’re shelving the super-obscure titles), and should be merged properly.

 

Example:

 

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Thank you!

 

 P.S.

E-mail notifications

 

You've probably noticed that your mail boxes have no BookLikes e-mails :( SO sorry for this silence!

 

We're experiencing some mailing issues that's why you have not received the e-mail notification for some time now. We're working to fix the problematic issues and we do hope everything will be back to normal any day now.

 

So sorry for this inconvenience! Your notifications on the service should be working fine so you can still stay up to date with the comments, likes, reblogs and discussions. Just check the notification spot next to the main menu button on the top of your Dashboard.

 

With any questions or concerns, please don't hesitate and mail Kate@booklikes.com

#8 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Momma Says to Read

 

It's Follow Friday with book bloggers! Say Hello to Becky from Momma Says to Read: http://mommasaystoread.booklikes.com/

 

 

When was the very first time you thought “Books. I cannot live without them!”?

 

Oh, gosh, I’ve had a love for books since those first Little Golden Books that my mom read to me as a toddler. I can remember finishing a book and absolutely needing to go to a bookstore for my next read. Thankfully, with Kindle, I always have another book ready to go.

 

How did your blogging adventure start and what are your impressions so far?

 

Actually, blogging started with Amazon. I was one of the many that got hit with a review ban and having all past reviews suppressed. Reading and reviewing is something that I enjoy doing and I’ve found so many new authors to enjoy from review programs. So, during the two-month battle with the elusive Community Reviews Team at Amazon, my daughter suggested a blog. Honestly, I was resistant at first. Seriously, who was going to read my blog? Once I started, I found that I really enjoy the blog and when I see the numbers on views, I get excited. So, I suppose you could say that blogging turned out to be a happy surprise for me. I never thought I would like it so much.

 

 

Do you read one book or several at the same time?

 

Typically, I read one book at a time, but if I’m having trouble getting into a story or just not enjoying it, I have been known to lay it aside and start something else. I do go back and finish the laid-aside book. I’m somewhat compulsive about that – Once I start a book, I have to finish it, even if it takes me awhile.

 

You write “I don't pull punches when I review, love it or hate it, you get what I think.” What’s the process for writing your book reviews?

 

It’s pretty simple, really. I pick books to read and review the same as I’ve always picked books – if it sounds interesting, I’ll read it. I always start a book with the idea that I’ll like it and very often, I do. When I finish a book, I take some time to think about how I feel about the story – that takes longer for some books than others, but I never just finish and immediately write the review.

 

Regardless of how I feel about the book, I don’t bash or attack the story or the author. I always try to be respectful, but I will be honest. If there are plot holes, if the story jumps around too much, if it’s repetitive, etc. I notice those things and even if I like a story, those distractions will be mentioned in my review. Similarly, if the book is labeled as a bad boy romance, I expect a bad boy. If it’s an Urban Fantasy, I expect solid world-building and the supernatural. If it’s a sports romance, I expect to see something of the actual sport. Telling me that the main character plays football, but no other mention of the sport does not make it a sports romance. Those mislabels are a particular pet peeve of mine, and you can bet that when I find them, you’ll see them in my reviews.

That line from my blog is pretty much how I am with everything. I don’t mince words, but I do respectfully give my honest opinion. I am passionate about books and reading and that often comes out in my reviews.

 

 

You’re an editor. How does your profession affect your reading life and your book picks?

 

Honestly, it doesn’t. I still have the same favorites and will continue to read them. I have a handful of authors that I watch for the next release and buy it as soon as it hits the shelves – John Sandford, Jim Butcher, JR Ward, Gabi Moore, Mary Abshire, Casey Hagen, Stella Starling (just to name a few).

I do ask for a synopsis of any book before I agree to edit. If it doesn’t sound interesting to me, I don’t take it on. To be effective as an editor, I do have to actually read the story and if I don’t think I’ll be interested in the story, I don’t feel like I can do it justice.

 

What are your favorite genres? Why are they special?

 

That’s a hard one! I love several genres and will read almost all of them. I do stay away from Sci-fi, aliens, that kind of thing. They just don’t interest me.

My favorite genres really depend on my mood at the time. I love dark romance and psychological thrillers, but after reading something dark, I tend to go to something light and humorous, so usually a RomCom. I also love anything to do with the supernatural, particularly Urban Fantasy.

As far as what makes them special, if a book pulls me in, makes me feel things, and keeps me turning pages, it’s special. The genre is irrelevant at that point.

 

Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers?

 

I suppose any story that excites me. I’ve been a member of Gabi Moore’s ARC team for a while and when I get a new email with ARC in the subject line, I get excited before I even open it. The same with Mary Abshire. Of course, those are among my favorites and I never have a problem recommending them, but the same goes for any book that I truly enjoy.

I’m also a huge fan of a good series and when I find one, I quickly recommend it. Heather Myers’ Slapshot series, John Sandford’s Prey series, and Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files, and JR Ward’s Black Dagger Brotherhood are just a few of my favorites.

 

 

What are your three favorite book covers?

 

Brooke Kinsley’s Jewels and Panties series has some beautiful covers, and the fact that they give no hint at the darkness within always intrigues me. (There are seven books so far and I love them all.)

 

Jewels and Panties: Sex Prescribed - Brooke KinsleyReagan Through the Looking Glass (Hacking Wonderland Book 1) - Allyson Lindt,Daqri BernardoHeart of Darkness: A Gripping Bad Boy Romance (Bad Boys After Dark Book 1) - Gabi Moore

 

This one from Allyson Lindt is a recent favorite. I’ve always loved Wonderland and this cover quickly caught my eye.

 

Gabi Moore’s Heart of Darkness cover is another favorite. The book is also a favorite of mine and that cover goes perfectly with the story.

 

I don’t know that I could necessarily narrow it down to my three favorites as I have so many, but those are the ones that I thought of first, so I guess you could say that they are among the top favorites.

 

How do you decide what to read next?

 

I keep a calendar to keep track of release dates and if it’s an ARC, I always try to read and review as close to the release date as possible But, my next read also greatly depends on my mood at that moment. I often scroll through my TBR list and see what catches my eye. If there’s a new release in a favorite series, then that is usually the next book I’ll start reading, especially if it’s something I’ve been anticipating for a while.

 

 

What’s the new release you’re impatiently waiting for right now?

 

That would have to be Brooke Kinsley’s newest addition to the Jewels and Panties series. The last one ended in a cliffy and I’m dying to see what’s next.

 

What’s your reading spot? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

One spot? That’s funny! My Kindle goes everywhere with me, and I do mean everywhere. That little text to speech option is perfect for me. If I’m busy (gardening, sewing, cooking, etc), I grab my earbuds and listen, so I don’t really have a “spot” other than my Kindle is always at hand.

 

If you could meet one literary character, who would it be?

 

That one’s easy! Harry Dresden from Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files. I absolutely love that crazy wizard. Of course, it would have to be in a wide-open space. If you’re familiar with the series, then you already know that Harry is hell on buildings.

 

Ebooks or paper books?

 

I resisted the eBook idea for a while. There’s just something about holding that book in your hand. But, when I finally broke over and bought a Kindle, I was hooked. Literally, thousands and thousands of books right at your fingertips! I was like a kid in a candy store.

 

Your favorite quote?

 

I have several from favorite stories, but one of my all-time faves is about books rather than from a book.

 

 

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

We’re currently getting ready for a move and all of my “friends” are lovingly packed in boxes, ready to go. There are about 50 of those boxes – we’re a family of six, all readers, and we all have our own favorites that we just can’t part with!

 

Thank you!

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Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

 

You can nominate your blogger friends to the Follow Friday interview! Click here and leave the URL address in the comment section.

 

See you next Friday!

12 September new releases and bloggers' book reviews

Are you reading the right September books? Make sure the following titles find their way to your September reading schedule, and if you're in doubt check out the reviews from BookLikes bloggers below.

 

Happy reading!

 

 

Girls Made of Snow and Glass - Melissa Bashardoust Girls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust 

Out: September 5, 2017

Frozen meets The Bloody Chamber in this feminist fantasy reimagining of the Snow White fairytale. At sixteen, Mina's mother is dead, her magician father is vicious, and her silent heart has never beat with love for anyone―has never beat at all, in fact, but she’d always thought that fact normal. She never guessed that her father cut out her heart and replaced it with one of glass. When she moves to Whitespring Castle and sees its king for the first time, Mina forms a plan: win the king’s heart with her beauty, become queen, and finally know love. The only catch is that she’ll have to become a stepmother... more

 

Review: 

Pitched as a feminist retelling, "Girls Made of Snow and Glass", doesn't disappoint in the least. Told in the alternative pov's of Mina, the stepmother Queen and Lynet, the snow Princess, this is a story that most surely will stay with the reader long after its read... What if there was more to the "tale" of the "evil" stepmother and her "naive" stepdaughter? What if there was a story of trying to break with one's past and one's sorrow? What if you only wanted to be loved, but never quite achieved that? How would you turn out with people trying to make a puppet out of you? This is the story of two women both trying to find out their true natures in a grey world . A world of snow and cold. And of bitter family ties... continue reading on the Susana "Lost in Fantasy Land" blog

 

 

The Golden House: A Novel - Salman Rushdie The Golden House by Salman Rushdie

Out: September 5, 2017

A modern American epic set against the panorama of contemporary politics and culture—a hurtling, page-turning mystery that is equal parts The Great Gatsby and The Bonfire of the Vanities.

On the day of Barack Obama’s inauguration, an enigmatic billionaire from foreign shores takes up residence in the architectural jewel of “the Gardens,” a cloistered community in New York’s Greenwich Village. The neighborhood is a bubble within a bubble, and the residents are immediately intrigued by the eccentric newcomer and his family. Along with his improbable name, untraceable accent, and unmistakable whiff of danger, Nero Golden has brought along his three adult sons... more

 

Review:   

This is some serious, epic Greek tragedy. At its heart is the question of “Can a man be both good and evil?” and yet it is also about the role of the storyteller and the unmasking of America. As always, his wordplay is a twisty, tangled delight, filled with a myriad of literary and cinematic references that gladdened the heart of this lifelong reader girl and degree holder of a Masters in Film Theory.

This is a long book, over the top in many ways, but so so clever. I was totally caught up in the lives of the Golden family – Nero and his three sons all cloaked in mystery that the intrepid Réné is hellbent on unraveling for his own artistic pursuits. And so, the narrator becomes part of the story... read more on the author Tellulah Darling's blog ->

 

Sing, Unburied, Sing: A Novel - Jesmyn Ward Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward  

Out: September 5, 2017

Jojo and his toddler sister, Kayla, live with their grandparents, Mam and Pop, and the occasional presence of their drug-addicted mother, Leonie, on a farm on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. Leonie is simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high; Mam is dying of cancer; and quiet, steady Pop tries to run the household and teach Jojo how to be a man. When the white father of Leonie’s children is released from prison, she packs her kids and a friend into her car and sets out across the state for Parchman farm, the Mississippi State Penitentiary, on a journey rife with danger and promise... more

 

 

A Legacy of Spies: A Novel - John le Carré A Legacy of Spies: A Novel - John le Carré  

Out: September 5, 2017

Peter Guillam, staunch colleague and disciple of George Smiley of the British Secret Service, otherwise known as the Circus, is living out his old age on the family farmstead on the south coast of Brittany when a letter from his old Service summons him to London. The reason? His Cold War past has come back to claim him. Intelligence operations that were once the toast of secret London, and involved such characters as Alec Leamas, Jim Prideaux, George Smiley and Peter Guillam himself, are to be scrutinized by a generation with no memory of the Cold War and no patience with its justifications... more

 

Review:

What surprised me most about the book was how beautiful the language is. Le Carré writes with clarity and precision, capturing nuances of speech, thought and culture with deft touches that are evocative without being obtrusive. He moves skillfully from past to present, from lie to truth, from regret to rage, in a way that fully engaged my mind and my emotions. The premise of the book is a present day investigation into British security operations during the Cold War. It is told through contemporary interrogations by a rather loathsome lawyer, extracts from official, secret but not necessarily truthful records and intensely intimate memories of the retired spy from whose point of view the story is told. This is a strong spy story, full of intrigue and deception and betrayal but those are really just the vehicle for the true heart of the novel... continue reading on the Audio Book Junkie blog ->

 

 

Tales of Two Americas: Stories of Inequality in a Divided Nation - Teri Schnaubelt,John Freeman (Editor),Tantor Audio,Corey M. Snow Tales of Two Americas: Stories of Inequality in a Divided Nation by Teri Schnaubelt, John Freeman...

Out: September 5, 2017

Thirty-six major contemporary writers examine life in a deeply divided America—including Anthony Doerr, Ann Patchett, Roxane Gay, Rebecca Solnit, Hector Tobar, Joyce Carol Oates, Edwidge Danticat, Richard Russo, Eula Bliss, Karen Russell, and many more.
America is broken. You don’t need a fistful of statistics to know this. Visit any city, and evidence of our shattered social compact will present itself. From Appalachia to the Rust Belt and down to rural Texas, the gap between the wealthiest and the poorest stretches to unimaginable chasms. Whether the cause of this inequality is systemic injustice, the entrenchment of racism in our culture, the long war on drugs, or immigration policies, it endangers not only the American Dream but our very lives... more

 

 

Little Fires Everywhere - Celeste Ng Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Out: September 12, 2017

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.
Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community... more

 

Review:

Celeste Ng just raised the bar for everyone else. Litte Fires Everywhere upended my expectations - not with a plot twist or anything so flashy, but about halfway through the story she's writing suddenly becomes clear. In talking about books with friends, or with people at the store, I realize I can be overly critical about the things that I read. Even with a book I enjoyed I'll find a nagging fault, whether its overuse of certain words, a clunky character, convenient plot devices, a problem with pacing - something - to the extent that I wonder if I can even find a book that is simply a pleasure to read. Reading Little Fires Everywhere was like finally getting a good night's rest. The perfect read does exist, for me this was it.... continue reading on the Books Read, Not Necessarily Well blog ->

 

 

A Column of Fire (Kingsbridge) - Ken Follett A Column of Fire by Ken Follett  

Out: September 12, 2017

International bestselling author Ken Follett has enthralled millions of readers with The Pillars of the Earth and World Without End, two stories of the Middle Ages set in the fictional city of Kingsbridge. The saga now continues with Follett’s magnificent new epic, A Column of Fire.
In 1558, the ancient stones of Kingsbridge Cathedral look down on a city torn apart by religious conflict. As power in England shifts precariously between Catholics and Protestants, royalty and commoners clash, testing friendship, loyalty, and love. Ned Willard wants nothing more than to marry Margery Fitzgerald. But when the lovers find themselves on opposing sides of the religious conflict dividing the country, Ned goes to work for Princess Elizabeth. When she becomes queen, all Europe turns against England...more

 

 

Nyxia (The Nyxia Triad) - Scott ReintgenNyxia by Scott Reintgen  

Out: September 12, 2017

Emmett Atwater isn’t just leaving Detroit; he’s leaving Earth. Why the Babel Corporation recruited him is a mystery, but the number of zeroes on their contract has him boarding their lightship and hoping to return to Earth with enough money to take care of his family. Forever. Before long, Emmett discovers that he is one of ten recruits, all of whom have troubled pasts and are a long way from home. Now each recruit must earn the right to travel down to the planet of Eden—a planet that Babel has kept hidden... more

 

Review:

OHMYGOODNESS this book was 10/10 and I am so in love and I need the sequel now and you need to read it now. It's kind of like Divergent meets Ender's Game, and if anyone loved the Remnants series as much as I did, I have a feeling the sequels could have the same amount of philosophy.

And I could not put it down.

So nyxia is a substance found on another planet that can be manipulated in many ways, and that gives this book a fantastical element. But a realistically fantastical element. Like sci-fi with a bit of magical realism thrown in. It makes for a really unique plot that, though it incorporated elements of other books I've loved, was different to anything I've read before in many ways... continue reading on The Dilemma of Reading blog ->

 

 

The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye - George Goulding,David Lagercrantz

The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye by David Lagercrantz 

Out: September 12, 2017

Lisbeth Salander is an unstoppable force: Sentenced to two months in Flodberga women's prison for saving a young boy's life by any means necessary, Salander refuses to say anything in her own defence. She has more important things on her mind.

Mikael Blomkvist makes the long trip to visit every week - and receives a lead to follow for his pains. For him, it looks to be an important expose for Millennium. For her, it could unlock the facts of her childhood.

Even from a corrupt prison system run largely by the inmates, Salander will stand up for what she believes in, whatever the cost. And she will seek the truth that is somehow connected with her childhood memory, of a woman with a blazing birthmark on her neck... more

 

 

Warcross - Marie Lu Warcross by Marie Lu  

Out: September 12, 2017

For the millions who log in every day, Warcross isn’t just a game—it’s a way of life. The obsession started ten years ago and its fan base now spans the globe, some eager to escape from reality and others hoping to make a profit. Struggling to make ends meet, teenage hacker Emika Chen works as a bounty hunter, tracking down players who bet on the game illegally. But the bounty hunting world is a competitive one, and survival has not been easy... more

 

Review:

A sci-fi book about a game that is part of everyday life AND written by Marie Lu, sign me in! I was way too excited about this book and I almost broke my phone when I get the e-mail saying I got the galley. Warcross is more than just a game, it is a way of live and is part of everyone's daily life. Emika Chen is an orphan with rainbow hair (that detail was too cool not to be mentioned) who is trying to earn some money by tracking down illegal players. But her life is about to change completely. The idea of Warcross is amazing, not that it has never been done before, but I liked how it was handled. I am almost sure that this kind of game will happen someday and we may be closer to it than we think... continue reading on the Line Bookaholic blog ->

 

 

Autonomous - Annalee Newitz Autonomous by Annalee Newitz  

Out: September 19, 2017

When anything can be owned, how can we be free. Earth, 2144. Jack is an anti-patent scientist turned drug pirate, traversing the world in a submarine as a pharmaceutical Robin Hood, fabricating cheap scrips for poor people who can’t otherwise afford them. But her latest drug hack has left a trail of lethal overdoses as people become addicted to their work, doing repetitive tasks until they become unsafe or insane. Hot on her trail, an unlikely pair: Eliasz, a brooding military agent, and his robotic partner, Paladin. As they race to stop information about the sinister origins of Jack’s drug from getting out, they begin to form an uncommonly close bond that neither of them fully understand... more

 

 

Release - Patrick Ness Release by Patrick Ness  

Out: September 19, 2017

Adam Thorn doesn’t know it yet, but today will change his life. Between his religious family, a deeply unpleasant ultimatum from his boss, and his own unrequited love for his sort-of ex, Enzo, it seems as though Adam’s life is falling apart.  At least he has two people to keep him sane: his new boyfriend (he does love Linus, doesn’t he?) and his best friend, Angela. But all day long, old memories and new heartaches come crashing together, throwing Adam’s life into chaos... more

 

Review:

Once upon a time I read a Patrick Ness book, and it pissed me off so much I threw it across the room. In the years that have followed he has since published numerous books that have sparked my interest, but I always ended up giving them a pass - first impressions matter. When I managed to get my hands on an advance copy of this book (Thank you, Harper!) I was dubious, but curious. I'm so glad my curiosity won out - this is one of my favorite reads so far this year... continue reading on the Folding Paper & Spilling Ink blog ->

 

 

And what are you September picks?

Hello September! 5 last chance giveaways: paranormal, fantasy, ya, and a dog love story

Here come September goodies! These 5 giveaways come to an end September 9th so here's your last chance to grab them! Click the graphics or the links below to go on the specific giveaway page with the detailed book information, and request your own copy. 

 

A note: due to an international audience the final end time for a given giveaway may vary in accordance to your time zone.

 

Find more giveaways by entering the Giveaways page (menu->Giveaways) or click HERE.

 

Good luck!

 

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Happy winning!