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20 Desserts Inspired by Your Favorite Children’s Books [Infographic], and how to find more Kid Lit

— feeling hungry

WARNING! A mouth-watering post.

 

Reading goes well with sweets. Do you wonder what kind of snack fits the book the most? The following graphics from Shari's Berries is an excellent guide for book AND dessert pairing. You know what it means? Books and chocolate = heaven!

 

And what's you favorite reading time snack?

 

Scroll down to find 6 children's books from BookLikes bloggers bookshelves.

kids book and dessert pairingInfographic via www.berries.com

 

6 Kid lit picks from your bookshelves

 

If you're wondering what Children books book bloggers are reading, go to the Book Catalog page (menu -> Book Catalog: http://booklikes.com/catalog), select the Children category of the left and scroll down for Recently read section:

 

 

Gracefully Grayson - Ami Polonsky Gracefully Grayson - Ami Polonsky  


Grayson Sender has been holding onto a secret for what seems like forever: "he" is a girl on the inside, stuck in the wrong gender's body. The weight of this secret is crushing, but sharing it would mean facing ridicule, scorn, rejection, or worse. Despite the risks, Grayson's true self itches to break free. Will new strength from an unexpected friendship and a caring teacher's wisdom be enough to help Grayson step into the spotlight she was born to inhabit?

 

The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly - Kim Chi-Young,Sun-mi Hwang,Nomoco The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly - Kim Chi-Young,Sun-mi Hwang,Nomoco  

This is the story of a hen named Sprout. No longer content to lay eggs on command only to have them carted off to the market, she glimpses her future every morning through the barn doors, where the other animals roam free, and comes up with a plan to escape into the wild—and to hatch an egg of her own. An anthem for individuality and motherhood, The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly has captivated millions of readers in Korea, where it is a contemporary classic.

 

A Dragon's Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans - Joanne Ryder,Laurence Yep A Dragon's Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans - Joanne Ryder,Laurence Yep  

Crusty dragon Miss Drake has a new pet human, precocious Winnie. Oddly enough, Winnie seems to think Miss Drake is her pet—a ridiculous notion! Unknown to most of its inhabitants, the City by the Bay is home to many mysterious and fantastic creatures, hidden beneath the parks, among the clouds, and even in plain sight. And Winnie wants to draw every new creature she encounters: the good, the bad, and the ugly. But Winnie’s sketchbook is not what it seems.

 

 

I Am Pusheen the Cat - Claire Belton I Am Pusheen the Cat - Claire Belton  

This collection of oh-so-cute kitty comics—an online cult phenomenon, now for the first time in an adorable gift book—Pusheen combines the online reach of The Oatmeal’s How to Tell if Your Cat Is Plotting to Kill You with the super-sweet appeal of Hello Kitty. I Am Pusheen the Cat features some of the most popular comics from the website, including Reasons I Love Fall, Career Options for Your Cat, and Christmas To Do List, as well as a healthy serving (at least 25 percent) of never-before-seen material that is sure to delight Pusheen’s many dedicated fans.

 

A Whole New Ballgame - Phil Bildner A Whole New Ballgame - Phil Bildner  

Rip and Red are best friends whose fifth-grade year is nothing like what they expected. They have a crazy new tattooed teacher named Mr. Acevedo, who doesn't believe in tests or homework and who likes off-the-wall projects, the more "off" the better. And guess who's also their new basketball coach? Mr. Acevedo! Easy-going Rip is knocked completely out of his comfort zone. And for Red, who has autism and really needs things to be exactly a certain way, the changes are even more of a struggle. But together these two make a great duo who know how to help each other--and find ways to make a difference--in the classroom and on the court.

 

Beagle in a Backpack - Ben M. Baglio Beagle in a Backpack - Ben M. Baglio  

Mandy and James are distracted from Halloween planning when local girl Amber Hutton runs away from home with a stolen beagle puppy. Clues left around a sheep farm lead the kids to believe that Amber is hiding out on the moors.  But even if the girl and dog are found, will they all be able to make it safely back over the moors that are riddled with jagged holes and underground caves.

Source: http://www.berries.com/blog/kids-books-and-desserts

#4 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Nicole Reads

 

Say Hello to Nicole in Follow Friday interview session!

 

Follow Nicole Reads: http://lapetite.booklikes.com

 

Let’s start with the question about a book that took your breath away and made you a bookaholic. What was it?

 

White Fang - Jack London The book that took my breath away and made me a bookaholic was Jack London’s White Fang. I remember finding it in a bookstore; I was maybe 9 or 10 years old, where my mom left me for five minutes while she went to a store next door. I sat down in a corner and started reading it. My mom came back to get me, and I made her buy me the book. After that, I followed her around the mall with my nose in the book, hooked by the world of literature from that moment forward.

 

On your BookLikes blog you mention that you know English, Español, Spanglish, Français (un petit peu), Italiano (un po'). Do you read in these languages as well?

 

Yes! I mostly read in English because I’m living in the United States, but lately, I’ve been trying to read in Italian ever since I started learning it in 2015. That’s one of the reasons I got In Other Words by Jhumpa Lahiri. Ms. Lahiri wrote it in Italian, but it has the English translation right next to it. I also try to read in Spanish—my mother tongue—but it hasn't been as often as I would like.

 

You’ve mentioned having a travel bug :) Tell us more about your travels. Do they inspire your book picks?

 

Most definitely! I find there is no better way to get the feel of where I am going than to read the literature of that country. When I went to India, I read Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake. Last summer I traveled to Italy and read Letters to Juliet by Lise Friedman and Ceil Friedman. I also make it a goal to visit local bookstores and buy books from local authors. 

 

In Other Words - Jhumpa Lahiri,Ann Goldstein The Namesake - Jhumpa Lahiri Letters to Juliet - Lise Friedman, Ceil Friedman

 

What are your favorite book covers?

 

Sweetbitter: A novel - Stephanie Danler The Star-Touched Queen - Roshani Chokshi,Priya Ayyar  

Wild Beauty - Anna-Marie McLemore Tell The Wolves I'm Home - Carol Rifka Brunt

 

You mention that your favorite genres are Romance (Contemporary and Historical), Young Adult, Erotica, Travel, Food. Nice mixture! How do you choose the next book to read?

 

It all depends on what’s going on in my life. Am I feeling bogged down by university or life? I need something light and fluffy like my beloved romance novels. Is my wanderlust on overdrive? Best grab a travel memoir. I also like reading books that might be similar to what I'm writing, that way I can get a sense of what has been done and what might be missing.

 

 

What made you start writing about books/book blogging?

 

I started as a way to keep track of what I’m reading. Later I realized that there was an entire community of fellow book lovers who loved sharing suggestions on what to read next while also talking endlessly about the stories they read and the characters they loved. I finally felt I had found my corner on the Internet.

 

Did blogging have an impact on your reading life?

 

Certainly. It has made me more judicious when it comes to choosing what I will invest my time in reading. It also made me want to become a more voracious reader, reading beyond the genres I usually enjoy.

 

Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers?

 

I get excited recommending the books that made me stay up way past midnight reading, the ones that turned me into an antisocial being that refuses to interact with her fellow humans until she finishes the book, but mostly, I like recommending books that emotionally affected me. It’s always a special kind of thrill to see other people feel as strongly as you did about a book.

 

What’s your reading spot? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

I don’t have a particular spot per se. I read anywhere. My only requirement: it must be a plush, comfy seat.

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

This is a tough question because there is nothing that can compare to the thrill of holding a paper book in your hands and feeling that comforting weight on your hands, but I am going to say that I prefer e-books. As someone who travels a lot, there is nothing like the comfort of having a wide variety of books readily available in one place. Plus, I don’t have to pay extra for overweight luggage!

 

Three titles for a dessert island?

 

  • The Count of Monte Christo by Alexandre Dumas because that’s a lengthy tome and I have never gotten around to reading it because of its size.
  • Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto because it’s a touching, beautiful book.

Harry Potter and the philosopher's stone by J.K. Rowling because I would need a little magic in my life if I’m stuck on an island alone.

The Count of Monte Christo - Alexandre Dumas Kitchen - Banana Yoshimoto,Megan Backus Harry Potter and the philosopher's stone - J.K. Rowling

 

A book that changed your life?

The Little Prince - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry,Katherine Woods   

“The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. I try to re-read it every five years, and I always feel that I learned something new. It was the first book that broke my heart and then, with subsequent re-reads, made it whole again.

 

Favorite quote?

 

‘It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live,’ said by Albus Dumbledore in J.K Rowling’s first book of the Harry Potter series, “Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.”

 

 

If you could meet one literary character, who would it be?

 

Just one? That feels like an impossible choice! If I had to choose, it would be the vampire Lestat from Anne Rice’s “The Vampire Chronicles.” The Brat Prince looks like he knows how to have fun.

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

 

You can also find Nicole here:

BookLikes: http://lapetite.booklikes.com

 

*

 

Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

 

See you next Friday!

 

BookLikes How-to: Housekeeping! or, Using the Mass Post Editor

 

-- A guest post by Jenn from Murder by Death

 

If you’re a BookLikes veteran or new to BookLikes but with a huge import of data, you might, like me, look back at all of that history and think “I really need to clean some of those posts up” or “shoot, I wish I’d been using ‘x’ tag on all of those posts”, but then you imagine actually doing it, shudder to yourself, and find that sorting out your sock drawer suddenly sounds exciting.

 

OR, like I’ve been doing lately, you’ve gone to tag a post, see the mile long list of previously used tags and think to yourself “WHY do I have all those tags?  Was I drunk when I thought ‘tthhpphhhttt’ would make a good tag?” or you notice that you’ve collected multiple versions of the same tag and wish you could just clean that mess up.

 

Well, you can. Only tags that are actively used show up in that previously used menu - deleting those unwanted tags from all your posts makes them disappear from the list too.  And you can do that easily using the Mass Post Editor - it takes the ‘tedious’ out of blog housekeeping and puts it back in the sock drawer where it belongs.

 

To get to the Mass Post Editor, use your Dashboard pull down menu to get to your dashboard blog page (not your fancy public blog) - (http://booklikes.com/blog).  You can also go direct by using the following address (assuming you’re currently logged into BookLikes): http://booklikes.com/post/mass-editor/

 

 

 

On your blog page, look for the Mass edit posts and tags link on the right side of your page:

 

 

The Post Mass Editor page is pretty easy to use, but here's an overview of what you’ll see (if this is old news for you, scroll down for more information on cleaning up your tag list):

 

A: sort by: allows you to specify whether you want to sort your results by Publish Date or by Rating, ascending or descending.

 

B: The number of results you’d like to appear on a single page (max is 100).

 

C: status: allows you to narrow down your results to show only posts that are scheduled to be published in the future, currently published posts, or draft posts.  Leave this menu at —select— to show all three.

 

D: type:  allows you to narrow down which type of posts you want to display: Text, Photo, URL, Video, Quote, and Review.  Leaving this at —select— will return all types.

 

Please note that the fields A-D are live update options. Your search results will update instantly after you make a selection from any of these four fields. Selections made using date from (E) and with tags (F) will require you to click Show (K).

 

E: If you know that the posts you want to work with were done within a certain time frame, you can use the date from and date to fields.

This is especially helpful if you’re trying to find posts from a specific game or challenge (and you remember the dates).

 

F: with tags: This will narrow down your post results to only the posts that currently have the tags you select here.  You can select as many as you need to further narrow down your results, or leave it at —select tag— to display all.

 

The selections above, A-F are designed not only to make it easier to find what you’re looking for, but also to minimise the load on the BookLikes servers; the more specific your criteria, the easier it is for the databases to return your results as quickly and efficiently as possible. 

 

G:  select all / unselect all:  Once you’re ready to work with your posts, you can either use the individual check-boxes on the left of each post entry to select them, or choose select all to choose all of the posts in the list.  Likewise, unselect all will clear all the checkboxes.

 

H:  x delete posts:  Maybe blogging right after the cocktail hour wasn’t such a good idea, or maybe you just have posts that have expired content and you want to get rid of them. You can select those posts here and hit delete posts. Just be careful - you can’t undo delete posts. Once they’re gone - they’re gone.

 

I:  x remove tags:  remove tags from selected posts.

 

J:  + add tags:  add tags to selected posts.

 

K:  Show:  use this button to apply specific time frames or tags to your results.

 

L:  Type and Title:  Click on either the type or title of a specific post to go to that post.

 

M:  This is a shortcut for the tag menu (F):  clicking on the tags here will put them in the with tags section - just remember to hit Show to update the results.

 

N:  Edit:  Takes you directly to the edit post page so you can edit the post.

 

 

As I said at the start, it’s pretty self-explanatory, but I want to show you how you can use the mass post editor to clean up any superfluous tags you might have acquired over the years.

 

Using myself as the guinea pig, I’ve found that I have two tags:  audiobook and audiobooks.  I don’t need to have both so I want to edit all of my posts so they only use audiobooks, thereby deleting audiobook from my tag list.

 

I’ve searched for all published posts that use audiobook (the tag I ultimately want to get rid of):

 

 

I’ve used select all to check all (three) posts currently using audiobook, and then I clicked on + add tags:

 

Note that you can use this menu to create new tags and apply them to posts too.

 

I’ve selected the audiobooks tag I want to add and clicked Add tags.

 

Next, I’ve hit select all again (the checkboxes clear each time so you don’t accidentally change posts you didn’t mean to change).

 

This time, I’ve clicked x remove tags:

 

 

 

This looks a bit different; x remove tags only shows you the tags that are currently applied to the posts you’ve selected.  So, I’ve checked audiobook and clicked Remove tags.

 

Done!

 

Now, it’s important if you’re trying to replace one tag with another that you add the new tag before you remove the old one because clicking Remove tags automatically updates your results list.  What does this mean?  Well, if I had removed the audiobook tag first, my result list after removing it would look like this:

 

 

 

As you can see - I no longer have any posts in my list to add my new tag to, because I no longer have any that are tagged with audiobook

 

So, add first, remove last.

 

Once you’ve done this, and assuming you’ve applied it to all your posts, you’ll find that old tag is history.  (To check, make a change anywhere in your search criteria - hit show if you need to - and force BL to search again.  This will refresh your tag list.)  Yay!  Only about 100 more to go!

 

 

If you’ve been thinking your blog needed a bit of housekeeping, check out the Post mass editor.  Even if you already run a tight ship, don’t forget it can be a valuable resource for finding posts that aren’t tied to books on your shelves. So if someone comes up to you someday asking you for that youtube link to that cat video… you know, that one - with the cat doing that cute thing?… you’ll have a place to start.  ;-)

 

Happy BookLiking!

 

Art by Akgulian, Nishan

#3 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Tigus

Say Hello to Tigus in #FFWithBookBloggers session!

 

Follow Tigus on BookLikes: http://tigus.booklikes.com/

 

Tell us how did your book love begin?

 

I was about eight years old, and I remember reading Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, outside and tucked into corners of the schoolyard, while other kids ran around and played. Just before that, I had had a Grade 2 teacher, Mrs. Rainsborough who would read Judy Blume and Beverly Cleary to the class, and that's probably the earliest I remember loving stories and figuring out that there was a lot more where that came from. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing - Judy Blume  

 

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Translated by F. P. Walter and Illustrated by Milo Winter) - Jules Verne,Milo Winter,F. P. WalterThe Mouse and the Motorcycle - Beverly Cleary,Louis Darling,Tracy Dockray

 

I was into comic books around then, chiefly Spider-Man at first; Amazing Spider-Man #s 147, 149-50 (the culmination of the Jackal storyline) was a great lure...and since it functioned as a pretty cool Murder Mystery, that fit in well with my first Hardy Boys book, a good one, The Disappearing Floor. As I was growing out of that series for young readers, I jumped to one of two Agatha Christie books lying around the house--And Then There Were None --and that really hooked me on Mystery novels.

 

The Disappearing Floor - Franklin W. Dixon And Then There Were None - Agatha Christie

 

Science Fiction movies and TV shows were a big deal in the late 1970s, and my earliest SF reading commitments were Jack Williamson, and the Perry Rhodan English translations.

 

Death Waits in Semispace - Kurt Mahr Action: Division 3 - Kurt Mahr

 

Your BookLikes Shelf is packed with different genres: mysteries, biographies, sci-fi and fantasy, graphic novels, horrors. What makes you pick the book in a given genre?

 

I have these lists of recommended reading, mainly "100 Best" Lists, in book form, many of them out of date now, which became a bit of a publishing trend, let's say from about 1985-1990. Of course, the internet provides this sort of thing now--and my old lists have become a way to select books that have aged somewhat as the years go by and I acquire the titles.

 

Recently, there was this British mag, Crime Scene Magazine, that has kind of got me sweeping up just about everything they positively review; sadly, I think the mag is cancelled as of issue 7, so it the issues will serve as a finite list that I can actually finish up with someday!

 

All of this List reliance, though, probably takes a back seat to simply going to a big bookstore and browsing around for an hour or so; if I've been buying too many "List" choices, I make the trip about picking books out of the blue, based mainly on a back-cover synopsis, and certainly if I already know and love the writer's work.

 

What made you start writing about books/book blogging?

 

Well I don't actually write that many reviews, or do lengthy blogs, do I? I give updates each day, with some kind of quick reaction to what I just read, which at least keeps me around as an active, reliably present member. I like making my own Lists at BookLikes; that's fun!

 

Anyway, as for how all that started, it was after really committing to the internet around 1998 (I was kind of a holdout), and then discovering some forums and chatrooms and meeting people. Now it's kind of second nature, and my chief aim, as I get older, is to pick a few BookLikes friends who make their own updates that keep me interested in what they're reading...and not fight with anyone or insult anyone's taste.

 

via

 

Your profile picture on BookLikes blog - why Walter Matthau?

 

Is there any other reasonable choice? Actually, that particular image is sort of a classic one, even amongst his various mugshots, because it ends the film The Taking Of Pelham One-Two-Three (original version), and he's overdoing the hangdog look as he gives a gaze of shame to a villain who has just slipped up and given himself away. This was one of the first fairly violent movies I remember watching to the end on late-night TV as a kid...although I discovered later that it had been drastically edited, and was much more violent and cussword-ridden than I could have guessed. Displaced from the film, that Matthau face does reflect my inherent cynicism, though I try to keep even a cynical sense of humor, so I don't have to go the whole nine yards and just put up an Eeyore picture.

 

Did blogging have an impact on your reading life?

 

I would say not much, in any concrete sense. Getting feedback from friends will alert me to a book that looks interesting, now and then. My little bitty blogs don't affect much of anything, but give me a bit of pleasure. I would say that when I really love a book, it becomes a mission to spread the word a bit, and it's neat to see it up on someone's Planning To Read postings shortly after that (That was ME! I did that! They may not ever read it, but...I did that!).

 

When you write a book review - do you have a scheduled plan what to include or is it a spontaneous reaction to what you’ve just read?

 

If I'm writing a review, I've probably been inspired to not be lazy and get it done because three or four points about the book have crystallized in my mind. If I've walked home from the coffee shop, or for any other reason not had access to a computer right after finishing a fabulous book (I do not own a cellphone), that's actually a good thing, because I'll fill time analyzing the book in my head, sorting ideas and thoughts, and getting to a point where this light goes on and won't go off: "I think we've got a review here...so write it before you forget everything!" Still, I confess I don't write many reviews. I do love commenting on books as I go through them, though!

 

What are your three favorite book covers?

 

I love the cover on my old copy of Orbitsville, a novel by Bob Shaw; the cover art is by Tim White. I love the "stars as the ground' reversal, and just the way the trees and buildings are rendered--softly--with no sharp edges and an air of peace and gentleness, which is what Orbitsville is all about when you read the book. I would give anything to live in Orbitsville, and Tim White's version is especially appealing.

 

Meanwhile, the Agatha Christie novel I rudely passed on when I was a kid at home--in favor of And Then There Were None (which oddly did not have the better cover) was a Fontana (I think) paperback edition with this nifty skull/candy-apple image as the main attraction; I love the stark effectiveness of it: evil melds with childhood innocence; terror merging with fondly-remembered fun and games. I especially like how the image actually seems to be really wet, gooey, ooze dripping down--the eyes having almost a tactile response, maybe even a smell unwittingly imagined. I remember now...I think I wanted to save what looked like the better Christie choice for later; that was the thinking.

 

Lastly, I'll mention a Baen paperback edition of a Retief collection by Keith Laumer... Retief of the CDT. So arrogant and cocky is Retief--but then he does look like he's earned a bit of a swelled head, given the state of the giant beastie lying behind him.

 

Retief of the CDT - Keith Laumer

 

Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers?

 

I'm not sure how to answer this. If the point is not for me to just list my all-time favorites, then I would say as an alternative to that kind of excitement, it's most fun when someone reads something I loved not long after I read it, so that if conversation breaks out--even healthy disagreement on just how good the book is (or not)--I never have go to "Well, I read it a long time ago...".

 

What’s your reading spot? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

Well you're not gonna get photos, because I avoid cellphones, and what you would see is your standard coffee shop, with perhaps a focus on a favored table near the window and far from talkers and people who make strange noises. Go to a Starbucks and figure out which table the bookworm would sit at, and take a picture of it, because that's where I'd be. It would be a boring, underwhelming picture, but it's heaven for me with a book and a beverage.

 

via Tigus blog Shelf

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

Just paper books, so far. Maybe e-books sometime up in the future.

 

Three title for a dessert island?

 

I'm not going to stew over this painful question for very long, because it can become very frustrating to make choices. I'll pick The Count of Monte Christo, amongst books that I have not read yet, because it's long, and I have faith that I will enjoy it. Then, I'll change gears, and pick two books I have already read: I'll take my favorite book of all time (so far): The Anubis Gates, by Tim Powers. And I'll bring my favorite Wodehouse's Quick Service.

 

The Count of Monte Christo - Alexandre DumasThe Anubis Gates (Ace Science Fiction) - Tim PowersQuick Service - P.G. Wodehouse

 

A book that changed your life?

 

Why Men Are The Way They Are, by Warren Farrell. 

 

Favorite quote?

 

Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.

William Shakespeare, Measure For Measure

 

If you could meet one author, who would it be?

 

PG. Wodehouse, no contest. I did get to meet Robert Silverberg, briefly, at TorCon 3 in 2003, and he signed my copy of Up the Line. That was cool!

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

That's just not going to happen, but can we compromise with a photo taken of me today at work, with a cellphone (not mine)?

 

 

Missed previous Follow Friday talks? Use ffwithbookbloggers tag or click the catch up links:

 

 

See you next Friday!

What did you read in July, and how to find reading challenge posts?

 

Seven months checked, five still to go. Have a look at BookLikes bloggers July reads and let us know how are you doing in your 2017 reading challenge. Click the blogs' headings to visit the blog pages and follow the reviewers.

 

Scroll down to view more June reading reviews from book bloggers. Happy reading!

 

  A Name Unknown (Shadows Over England) - Roseanna M. White Where the Light Falls: A Novel of the French Revolution - Owen Pataki, Allison Pataki Boss - Tracy Brown The Cartel 7: Illuminati: Roundtable of Bosses - Ashley and JaQuavis, JaQuavis Coleman  
I'm super excited that I was able to read 7 books this month. I've been struggling for a long while. My health and not having a good system in place has affected me greatly, but now I think I have a good one. I talked about it in a previous post. I will listen up to 5% of each book for the month and... continue reading
 
Gork, the Teenage Dragon - Gabe Hudson In The Still - Jacqueline Chadwick Dark and Stars (Serengeti, #2) - J.B. Rockwell The Late Show - Michael Connelly
I didn't finish nearly as much as I'd intended to this month -- every book I've read over the last couple of weeks has taken me at least 1 more day than I'd estimated/planned. There are two books I was supposed to read and write about in July that I haven't started yet -- whoops. Still, I read a lot of pretty good stuff this month, and that's the important thing, right?... continue reading

 

Artificial Sweethearts (North Pole, Minnesota) - Julie Hammerle  Lumberjanes Vol. 1 - Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, Brooke Allen  Thor, Vol. 1 - Coipel Olivier, J. Michael Straczynski Wilde Like Me - Louise Pentland

Favorite book(s) of the month: every single one of them

THIS HAS BEEN SUCH A GOOD READING MONTH.

I didn't expect it. I felt a bit of a reading slump coming but I powered through it... continue reading

 

Bone White - Ronald Malfi A Game of Ghosts: A Charlie Parker Thriller - John Connolly For Those Who Dream Monsters - Anna Taborska, Steve Upham, Charles Black, Reggie Oliver, Reggie Oliver Norse Mythology - Neil Gaiman

In July I read 19 books! ... continue reading

 

The Doctor's Undoing (Love Inspired Historical) - Allie Pleiter Persepolis I & II - Marjane Satrapi A Walk in the Woods - Bill Bryson Licensed for Trouble - Susan May Warren

Two things helped push the number of books I read this month higher than usual: 24in48 Read-a-thon and binge reading series via COYER. Since the start of COYER, I have managed to read through 4 series (1 was a duet, the others were longer). I will not be adding any more books to the list in August because I want to finish off the list. I am finding myself to be a definite mood reader (see binge reading a series) rather than a list follower... continue reading

 

 

If you've missed June wrap ups by other BookLikes bloggers, have a look at the following posts, and feel invited to read and join :) If we haven't included your post link, let us know in the comment section below.

 

 

To check what other readers are reading in 2017 reading challenge click the tag underneath this post:

 

 

OR type the tag in the book search box above and select TAGS:

 

 

And you'll see a collection of posts WITH this tag. Only posts with a tag will be presented.

 

 

If you haven't used the tags yet, we do highly recommend using them in your BookLikes posts.Type in a tag and press comma to insert it OR use your most recent tags OR search an accurate tag in your tag list and select.

Tags are great and they will organize your blog posts and improve deliverability of your writings among community.

Let's tag! :-)

 

Happy writing and tagging!

#2 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Punya Reviews…

Follow Punya Reviews… : http://punya.booklikes.com

 

Let’s start with the first book you’ve read. Did that title made you a book lover?

 

OOn the Night of the Seventh Moon - Victoria Holth, I don’t really remember what the first book I ever read was but I do know that  reading books was something that has been instilled in me from childhood. My first book very well may have been a nursery rhyme or a fairytale. But I can tell you the first book that introduced Romance to me. It was a translated copy of Victoria Holt’s On the Night of the Seventh Moon. Yes I loved the title of this book enough to go in search of more Victoria Holt books. It sure did make me a Romance novel lover!

 

On your blog page you write that you love reading romance and watching anything that is related to ghosts and haunting. What’s the best romance book and the best ghost movie/series you’ve ever read and watched?

 Dreaming of You - Lisa Kleypas

I have quite the list of favorite books, mainly under Historical Romance, which is my  favorite Romance sub-genre. Lisa Kleypas’s Dreaming of You is one of my all-time favorite Historical Romances. I enjoy reading real life haunting stories. I don’t watch as many movies as I read books, but I do watch some ghost hunting shows.

Ghost Adventures is my favorite show. I also enjoyed a very short lived show called The Great British Ghosts. This show was quite fascinating because of the legends and folklore that went with the so-called haunting of an old castle or an even older inn. I wish there were more seasons.

 

Since you’re a huge music lover we’re wondering whether the music influences your book picks or is it just a reading time companion?

 

I don’t choose music based on a book but I have, at times, thought of a certain book while listening to a certain song, and vice versa. I never do both at the same time. For me, it’s either reading or listening to music.

 

What made you start writing about books/book blogging?

 

Probably my love for reading and writing both. When I joined goodreads for the first time back in 2010, it was simply going to be a place to keep track of my reading. I have written long papers while doing my MA but I never thought about actually becoming a book reviewer. Then I begin writing down my thoughts about the book I was reading in the comments section of goodreads, and this kind of started my interest in book review going. In 2011, my blog Punya Reviews… also started as another place to post my reviews. However, within a year I knew I’d like to continue book blogging as long as I can because I vastly enjoyed the process of talking about a book from my own perspective.

 

Did blogging have an impact on your reading life?

 

Yes, it had. When I started doing blog tours, it did take up quite a bit of my time. Alongside my work hours, I was juggling regularly. My reviews are generally long, and writing those reviews took time too. I had to figure out how to balance it all. How many tours I can do a month so I can read and review the books I want to. Yet, through book blogging, I have discovered new authors and their books. So yes, blogging has had quite an impact on my reading life.

 

You have a MA degree in English Literature (Bravo!), does it mean you’re lucky to be reading books at your workplace? :)

 

Unfortunately, no. I don’t try to read at my workplace because I’m always distracted by this or that and reading, for me, is like meditation. I don’t like distractions when I’m reading. It’s also the reason why I prefer an e-ink reader (kindle paperwhite in my case), rather than a smart phone or devices like that.

 

What are your favorite book covers?

 

There are many of those. I generally love the book covers of the Historical Romance published from different publishers; the vibrant colors and the dresses really appeal to me. If I can mention stepbacks, I absolutely LOVE the original stepback of Dreaming of You. I thought this should’ve been the cover!

 

I also really liked the cover of an old bodice ripper by Sharon Salvato called Bitter Eden. I’ve never read it but I added it to my TBR just for the cover. Then there were those where I’d gotten enamored of a cover because of the hot guy featured on it. That’s one list that’s gonna take up pages. hahaha  

 

 

Which books are your most exciting recommendation to your followers?

 

I always recommend books by my favorite authors like Lisa Kleypas or Elizabeth Hoyt or Carla Kelly if they’re a Historical Romance lover like me. Lisa Kleypas’s Wallflowers  and Hathaways series or Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane  series. Carla Kelly has some ah-meh-zing books out there, most traditional regency or Christian-themed but I don’t mind.

By Lisa Kleypas Secrets of a Summer Night (The Wallflowers, Book 1) (The Wallflowers, Book 1) - Lisa Kleypas Wicked Intentions - Elizabeth Hoyt

 

I recently read A Moonbow Night by Laura Frantz. The narratives in that story were marvelous. The suspense in the end simply blew my mind. Very emotional, as well was a rewarding experience. If you’re going for a little erotically edgy Paranormal Romance, I’d highly recommend Janine Ashbless’s The Book of the Watchers series. I’m yet to finish book 2 cause I’m scared of another long wait until book 3 (waited for book 2 for almost 3yrs). I’m reading that one bit by bit, savoring it. I know, I’m weird like that.

 

A Moonbow Night - Laura FrantzCover Him With Darkness: A Romance - Janine AshblessIn Bonds of the Earth (Book of the Watchers) - Janine Ashbless

 

There are many authors I can mention here whose works I’ve recently come to admire, like Ramona Flightner, Emily Larkin, Morgan O’Neill, Scottie Barrett (steamy historical romance). The list can go on.

 

What’s your reading spot? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

Haha, I generally prefer my bed for reading, when I’m totally relaxed and not bothered by the outside world. I really wish I had a reading nook I could feature here. However, if you’d like to see a picture of the type of reading nook I’d love to have someday, here is one:

 

via Pintrest

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

At the moment, definitely ebooks! I’m in love with my kindle PW and wouldn’t exchange it for anything the world. I do understand the appeal of paperbacks but ebooks are just too convenient to “carry around”, if I may say so.

 

Three titles for a dessert island?

 

Hmmm, I’ve never given thoughts on DIK books. Still, if I had to choose in a nutshell: Lisa Kleypas’s Dreaming of You, any Carla Kelly title, Scottie Barrett’s Branded.

 

Dreaming of You - Lisa Kleypas Branded - Scottie Barrett Beau Crusoe - Carla Kelly

 

A book that changed your life?On the Night of the Seventh Moon - Victoria Holt

 

Again I’d like to refer back to Victoria Holt’s On the Night of the Seventh Moon. It got me interested in the Romance genre, inspiring me to explore and discover the many wonderful authors and books that I’ve read in the years since then.

 

Favorite quote?

 

Funnily enough, my most favorite quote isn’t from a book but from a song. Don’t get me wrong, there are numerous book quotes I’ve loved but this one is just…special. It’s from Sting’s An Englishman in New York, where he goes…

 

Be yourself, no matter what they say.

 

He’s one of my favorite singers and I love to sing along with him. :)

 

 

If you could meet one author, who would it be?

 

Okay, this will be a VERY difficult task to choose only one author. I want to meet all my favorite authors at least once in my life but… Lisa Kleypas, definitely! I’d like to ask her Derek’s whereabouts. I miss him. hahaha

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

Sadly, I don’t have a home library. More specifically nothing that I can actually show off. I don’t own many paperbacks cause I’ve been buying and reading ebooks for a while. For now, that’s where I’m building my library. But I hope to build a home library someday.

 

 Punya's virtual bookshelf on BookLikes

 

You can also find Punya here:

 BookLikes:

http://punya.booklikes.com

 Punya Reviews…

https://punyareviews.blogspot.com/

 Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/PunyaReviews/

 Twitter:

@PunyaHRashid

Book Review Spot: 7 book reviews from your book blogs, and where to find more

 

We've came across these 7 book reviews when visiting Book Catalog and Explore pages. Click the blog headings to visit the bloggers' webpage and to read the full book reviews. Enjoy!

 

The River Is Dark - Joe HartWord Gurgle gave 4 stars to The River Is Dark by Joe Hart:

There is plenty of fasted paced story in this novel to keep you moving through the story fluently. The writing is great. The story enjoyable. The story holds just the right amount of description in the right places. I did figure out the early on who the killer was, but it didn't deter me from the desire to keep reading. Liam is a great, well-developed character. Matter of fact, all the characters are very well developed... read the full review

 

 

LAUREN B. DAVIS gave 5 stars to The Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects - Barbara G. WalkerThe Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects - Barbara G. Walker 

A wonderful work on the study of symbols and sacred objects as they relate to the female. It's an excellent companion to the marvelous "The Book Of Symbols: Reflections On Archetypal Images" offering insight on the feminine roots of many of our symbols. Just as an example, one such symbol is the fish, widely accepted to be the symbol of Christianity, but which is actually FAR older. Ichthys was the offspring of the ancient Sea goddess Atargatis, and was known in various mythic systems as Tirgata, Aphrodite, Pelagia, or Delphine. The word also meant "womb" and "dolphin" in some tongues... read the full review

 

Pretty Jane and the Viper of Kidbrooke Lane: A True Story of Victorian Law and Disorder: The First Unsolved Murder of the Victorian Age - Paul Thomas Murphy  Sheila's Reads gave 4 stars to Pretty Jane and the Viper of Kidbrooke Lane: A True Story of Victorian Law and Disorder: The First Unsolved Murder of the Victorian Age by Paul Thomas Murphy

Jane Clouson is found on Kidbrooke Lane dying after a vicious beating. She is taken to the hospital where she later dies. The police now have to find the murderer. As they look at her short life and listen to what her friends have to say they believe they have found their murderer and arrest him. Next comes the court of law and the court of public opinion.This is interesting. Mr. Murphy uses modern forensic techniques to review the case and show who the murderer is. Unfortunately, forensic scien Jane Clouson is found on Kidbrooke Lane dying after a vicious beating... read the full review

Little One - Timothy G. HugueninT's Stuff too gave 5 stars to Little One by Timothy G. Huguenin

The creep factor in this book was over the top for me. I was on vacation with my Daughter and Grand Kids when I started reading this book. I was setting outside on the front porch of the cabin surrounded by a mountain in a very dark area while reading this. All at once I felt the need to go in the house and not read anymore. I also turned the TV on for the night in the room I was sleeping in, and I had only read half the book. The book is about Kelsea Hendricks Stone. She was given up for adoption as a young child. She doesn't remember her life before being adopted. Her birth parents have passed away and left her their house and possessions. Kelsea heads to a remote town in West Virginia to clean out the house and get it ready to sell... read the full review

 

A Million Worlds with You - Claudia Gray  The Caffeinated Diva reads... gave 5 stars to A Million Worlds With You

I have recently discovered that I have a thing for books about the multiverse.  Something about the unknown, about the possibilities... that excites me.  This book, this series, did exactly that.  I loved the world that the author built and how she changed it between the various multiverses.  I also loved the mechanism she used to tie the worlds together.  By mechanism, I don't mean the actual Firebird, but how she makes those worlds accessible. There is a lot of science involved in this series, but it is presented in such a way that it explains what it needs to without being anything like a lecture.  It also is the perfect tool to create villains and heroes... read the full review

The Bedlam Stacks - Natasha PulleyGrac's Never-ending TBR Pile of Doom gave 4 stars to The Bedlam Stacks 

Set in the same universe as The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, this book is not a sequel although one of the main characters from the previous books makes a couple of quite lengthy appearances - while that book was set in London, The Bedlam Stacks takes place mostly in Peru, as our protagonist is part of a mission sent to try and steal cuttings from cinchona trees in order to help produce quinine for the East India Company. We first meet Merrick Tremayne when he's recovering from a serious injury at his family home in Cornwall, which is literally falling apart around his ears... read the full review

 

The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo - Oscar Zeta Acosta,Manuel Acosta Sero,Hunter S. ThompsonWhat I am reading gave 5 stars to The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo

What do you expect from the autobiography of a man who called himself the Brown Buffalo? A man who ate the hottest hot sauce in the world for breakfast and chose A Whiter Shade of Pale as the theme song of his live? Regardless of what you might expect, you will be surprised, but not disappointed. This is the most unapologetic account of one’s life I can imagine. Acosta is not afraid of giving honest descriptions of his childhood, his acid trips, his genitals, his fears, feelings, actions or anything else... read the full review

 

 

What are you reviewing right now? If you're curious what others are reading and writing about here are several BookLikes places to visit.

 

 

Book Catalog page (main menu -> Book Catalog)

 

 

The very first section is the Recently reviewed on BookLikes section!

When you click the book cover you'll be moved to a book page where you can find all reviews published by the BookLikes community.

 

 

The most recent reviews will show up at the top so it's really easy to find the most recent opinion.

 

To visit the blog page click the see review link -- it's the right place to Like or Reblog the article and to Follow the blogger if you've enjoyed the review.

 

 

 

Explore page (main menu -> Explore)

 

Another place to discover the newest blog posts and reviews is the Explore page. There are two places to visit for the reviews: Just published section and Hot reviews. You can also use the menu on the left to go to the desirable section.

 

 

The Just published spot presents the most recently published blog posts whereas the Hot reviews spot highlights those reviews which are popular among BL community at the moment. To read the reviews just click the title and you'll be moved to the blog page with the full text.

 

 

Happy reviewing!

#1 Follow Friday with book bloggers: Jennifer's Books

 

Please welcome a new blog post series called Follow Friday with book bloggers. Reading and blogging isn't a solo activity that's why we're reaching to you, our lovely community and encouraging you to share your reading life insights.

 

The Follow Friday posts will be published every Friday - surprise, surprise! The new series will be accompanied with the notification announcement, we don't want you to miss anything!

 

We wish you a pleasant reading, and great exploring and discovery time!

 

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Follow Jennifer's Books: http://stellarraven.booklikes.com/

 

What was the book that made you a book lover?

 

I've loved reading pretty much from the moment I learned how. But a couple of books I remember from my childhood that really spurred my love of reading were Chocolate Fever by Robert Kimmel Smith, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary. I read the former so much my book literally fell apart, and the latter I wanted because I was age 8 myself at the time. The edition I owned was a mass market paperback sized book, and I remember feeling so grown up, because to me it looked like the books I saw my parents reading.

 

Chocolate Fever - Robert Kimmel Smith,Gioia Fiammenghi  Ramona Quimby, Age 8 - Beverly Cleary  

 

What made you start writing about books/book blogging?

 

I wanted a way to share my love of reading with others, and to find others who were interested in the same types of books that I am.

 

Did blogging have an impact on your reading life?

 

I would definitely say so. I've connected to readers around the world, and instead of just finding others who are interested in the same types of books I am, I've been introduced to other genres I might not have otherwise read.

 

What are you favorite genres? Why are they special?

 

I like too many genres to list, but I'd have to say my favorites are historical fiction, crime/mystery, and romance (historical romance, romantic suspense, and PNR romance). They're special to me—well, at least as far as the romances go anyway, because I can usually** rest assured that no matter what the main characters go through it will all work out in the end, and I'll get my HEA.

 

      **In my opinion, one of the biggest betrayals there is in a romance novel is no HEA, or at the very least a HFN.

 

On your BookLikes blog you’re regularly sharing weekly art post, can you tell the story behind the concept?

 

I love classic art, and I love reading, and I thought that a Weekly Art Post would be a great way to combine the two. I try to choose paintings (and a few vintage photographs) that feature the subject of the piece reading or ones that at least feature a book in some way. I'm in my second year doing this, and it's been great fun choosing which pictures to feature.

 

via

 

What are your favorite book covers?

 

As I mentioned in #7, I love classic art, so my attention really tends to be attracted by     books that use classic art/paintings or at least have that classic art kind of feel on their covers. I'm also really enjoying the covers for that Harry Potter illustrated editions.       

 

            Here's a few examples:

A Poisoned Season - Tasha Alexander  Silent in the Sanctuary - Deanna Raybourn  

Blood Magick - Nora Roberts

 

On your blog page you write: When I do write reviews, they may be just a few lines or rather lengthy. How does you review process look like?

 

I don't know that I have much of a process. A book has to really affect me—either positively or negatively—for me to write a detailed review these days. When I do decide to review, most of the time I end up just posting a few brief thoughts about the book.

 

via

 

Which books are you most excited recommending to your followers?

 

I generally don't recommend books all that often. I have this irrational fear of recommending something to someone and they end up utterly hating it.

 

What’s your reading spot? We’d love to see the photos :)

 

I generally prefer to read in my bed. And since a picture of my bed isn't all that thrilling, here's one of me on my bed, covered up with one of my cozy throw blankets with a book in hand. Not that that's all that thrilling either, but still...

 

 

A paper book or an e-book?

 

I enjoy both, but do tend to prefer paper books. E-books are so much easier to take along, though, whether on my phone or my kindle, it's nice to know that I am never without something to read.

 

Three title for a dessert island?

 

Oh man...what a tough question. How about Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling, (actually any of the HP books would do), And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie, and this may be a rather unconventional choice, but if I'm stranded on a deserted island I'm going to need at least one romance with me, so how about Lessons From a Scarlet Lady by Emma Wildes.

 

A book that changed your life?

 

As I mentioned before, I have loved reading for as long as I can remember, but if I had to point to one book that changed that love of reading into a need to read, it would have to be The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton. I was in 7th or 8th grade and was allowed to choose a book from the high school section of my school's library, because I read at a higher-than-my-age level. I absolutely fell in love with the book, and used to check it out from my school's library all the time.

 

Favorite quote?

I actually have two I'd like to share, it that's ok:

 

 

      “Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.” - Charles William Eliot

 

 

      “When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two things on my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home.” - Ponyboy Curtis (The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton)

 

 

If you could meet one literary character, who would it be?

 

Minerva McGonagall from the Harry Potter books. I am so awed by the entire wizarding world set up by J.K. Rowling, and McGonagall is by far and away one of my favorite characters from the series. I think it would be so fascinating to be able to meet and talk to her. I mean, can you imagine the stories she must have?

 

Shelfie time! Please share your home library photos :)

 

Ok, this is not the best picture, but my book shelf is located in a awkward spot. I pretty much had to be a contortionist to get a decent shot without too much of the door getting in the way.  And there's a whole shelf on the bottom that I couldn't even get in the picture. I also have a book cabinet which houses the bulk of my books. I didn't take a picture of it, because my organizational plan in there is pretty much “stack them in there in such a way as to fit in as many as humanly possible”.

 

 

I want to thank Kate @ BookLikes for asking me if I'd like to do this! It was fun!

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You can also find Jennifer here:

BookLikes: http://stellarraven.booklikes.com/

 

 

#ReadingNOW: 10 Books From Your Shelves

We've peeked into your bookshelves and found some nice summer book picks!

 

And guess what, you can do a nice book hunt as well! If you're curious what titles other book bloggers are reading, all you should do is to choose the Book Catalog from the drop down menu and scroll down until the Currently reading section. Click the book covers to go to the book pages where you'll find other editions of the titles and the book reviews.

 

Oh my! Our TBR pile is getting bigger and bigger, luckily, the virtual bookshelf is endless :)

 

 

 

10 BOOKS FROM YOUR CURRENTLY READING SHELVES

 

 

So many books, such little time. is currently reading:

 

A High Mortality of Doves - Kate Ellis A High Mortality of Doves by Kate Ellis  

1919. The Derbyshire village of Wenfield is still reeling from four terrible years of war, and now, just when the village is coming to terms with the loss of so many of its sons, the brutal murder of a young girl shatters its hard-won tranquillity.
Myrtle Bligh is found stabbed and left in woodland, her mouth slit to accommodate a dead dove, a bird of peace.
During the war Myrtle worked as a volunteer nurse with Flora Winsmore, the local doctor's daughter, caring for badly wounded soldiers at the nearby big house, Tarnhey Court.
When two more women are found murdered in identical circumstances, Inspector Albert Lincoln is sent up from London, a man not only wounded in war but damaged in peace by the death of his young son and his cold, loveless marriage... read more

 

 

Story of my success is currently reading:

 

An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth - Chris Hadfield An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield  

Colonel Chris Hadfield has spent decades training as an astronaut and has logged nearly 4000 hours in space. During this time he has broken into a Space Station with a Swiss army knife, disposed of a live snake while piloting a plane, and been temporarily blinded while clinging to the exterior of an orbiting spacecraft. The secret to Col. Hadfield's success-and survival-is an unconventional philosophy he learned at NASA: prepare for the worst-and enjoy every moment of it.

In An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, Col. Hadfield takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible. Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks, and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of achievement-and happiness... read more

 

 

Debbie's Spurts is currently reading:

 

The Fate of the Tearling: A Novel (The Queen of the Tearling Book 3) - Erika JohansenThe Fate of the Tearling by Erika Johansen  

In less than a year, Kelsea Glynn has transformed from a gawky teenager into a powerful monarch. As she has come into her own as the Queen of the Tearling, the headstrong, visionary leader has also transformed her realm. In her quest to end corruption and restore justice, she has made many enemies—including the evil Red Queen, her fiercest rival, who has set her armies against the Tear.To protect her people from a devastating invasion, Kelsea did the unthinkable—she gave herself and her magical sapphires to her enemy—and named the Mace, the trusted head of her personal guards, regent in her place. But the Mace will not rest until he and his men rescue their sovereign, imprisoned in Mortmesne... read more

 

 

~~ Elsbeth ❤❤❤ MM-Romance ~~ is currently reading:

 

Imago - N.R. Walker Imago by N.R. Walker  

Nerdy, introverted genius lepidopterist, Lawson Gale, is an expert on butterflies. He finds himself in a small town in Tasmania on a quest from an old professor to find an elusive species that may or may not even exist.
Local Parks and Wildlife officer, Jack Brighton, is an ordinary guy who loves his life in the sleepy town of Scottsdale. Along with his Border collie dog, Rosemary, his job, and good friends, he has enough to keep from being lonely.
But then he meets Lawson, and he knows he’s met someone special. There’s more to catching butterflies, Jack realises. Sometimes the most elusive creatures wear bow ties, and sometimes they can’t be caught at all.
Lawson soon learns there are butterflies he can’t learn about it in books... read more

 

 

Reading For The Heck Of It is currently reading:

 

Do Not Say We Have Nothing: A Novel - Madeleine Thien Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien  

Master storyteller Madeleine Thien takes us inside an extended family in China, showing us the lives of two successive generations―those who lived through Mao’s Cultural Revolution and their children, who became the students protesting in Tiananmen Square. At the center of this epic story are two young women, Marie and Ai-Ming. Through their relationship Marie strives to piece together the tale of her fractured family in present-day Vancouver, seeking answers in the fragile layers of their collective story. Her quest will unveil how Kai, her enigmatic father, a talented pianist, and Ai-Ming’s father, the shy and brilliant composer, Sparrow, along with the violin prodigy Zhuli were forced to reimagine their artistic and private selves during China’s political campaigns and how their fates reverberate through the years with lasting consequences... read more

 

 

theguywhoreads is currently reading:

 

The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger - Stephen King The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger by Stephen King  

A #1 national bestseller, The Gunslinger introduces readers to one of Stephen King’s most powerful creations, Roland of Gilead: The Last Gunslinger. He is a haunting figure, a loner on a spellbinding journey into good and evil. In his desolate world, which mirrors our own in frightening ways, Roland tracks The Man in Black, encounters an enticing woman named Alice, and begins a friendship with the boy from New York named Jake. Inspired in part by the Robert Browning narrative poem, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came,”... read more

 

 

Familiar Diversions is currently reading:

 

No Longer Human, Volume 2 - Osamu Dazai,Usamaru Furuya No Longer Human, Volume 2 - Usamaru Furuya 

Furuya's adaptation of No Longer Human takes place nearly seventy years after Dazai's original. Set in modern day Tokyo, Dazai's tale details the life of a young man originally from a well-off family from Japan's far north. Yozo Oba is a troubled soul incapable of revealing his true self to others. A weak constitution and the lingering trauma from some abuse administered by a relative forces him to uphold a facade of hollow jocularity since high school. The series is composed of three parts, referred to in the novel as "memorandums," which chronicle the life of Oba from his teens to late twenties. The comic is narrated by the artist, Furuya himself playing the role originally held by the author Dazai, who makes appearances at the start of each volume. In many ways, it could be said that Furuya has traveled a path that may be similar to Dazai's. Maybe that is what led these two together after 100 years... read more

 

 

Bookish for life is currently reading:

 

American Gods - Neil Gaiman American Gods by Neil Gaiman  

A storm is coming . . . Locked behind bars for three years, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the magic day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. A man no longer scared of what tomorrow might bring, all he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow’s best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday. A trickster and rogue, Wednesday seems to know more about Shadow than Shadow does himself. Life as Wednesday’s bodyguard, driver, and errand boy is far more interesting and dangerous than Shadow ever imagined—it is a job that takes him on a dark and strange road trip and introduces him to a host of eccentric characters whose fates are mysteriously intertwined with his own... read more

 

 

BrokenTune is currently reading:

 

Queen Lucia - E.F. Benson,Wanda McCaddon Queen Lucia by E.F. Benson

England between the wars was a paradise of calm and leisure for the very, very rich. Into this enclave is born Mrs. Emmeline Lucas - La Lucia, as she is known - a woman determined to lead a life quite different from the subdued formality of her class.
With her cohort, Georgie Pillson, and her husband, Peppino, Lucia upends the greats of high society: the imperious Lady Ambermere and her equally imperious dog, Pug; the odious Piggy and Goosie Antrobus; the Christian Scientist Daisy Quantrock, with her penchant for the foreign; and all the rest of the small English town that the British rich call their country home. Beset on all sides by pretenders to her social throne, Lucia brings culture, fine art, excitement, and intrigue into this cloistered realm
... read more

 

 

AUDIO BOOK JUNKIE is currently reading:

 

Ms. Bixby's Last Day - John David Anderson Ms. Bixby's Last Day by John David Anderson  

Everyone knows there are different kinds of teachers. The boring ones, the mean ones, the ones who try too hard, the ones who stopped trying long ago. The ones you’ll never remember, and the ones you want to forget. Ms. Bixby is none of these. She’s the sort of teacher who makes you feel like school is somehow worthwhile. Who recognizes something in you that sometimes you don’t even see in yourself. Who you never want to disappoint. What Ms. Bixby is, is one of a kind.Topher, Brand, and Steve know this better than anyone. And so when Ms. Bixby unexpectedly announces that she won’t be able to finish the school year, they come up with a risky plan—more of a quest, really—to give Ms. Bixby the last day she deserves... read more

 

And what are you reading now?

 

[Guest post] How I became a travel writer

 

Summer time means travels! Have a look at the confessions of a debut travel author, Nicholas Kontis, who encourages readers to focus more on the local experiences and local people when traveling. Maybe this read will inspire you to hit the road and explore something amazing this summer!

 

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A guest post by Nick Kontis

Follow Nicholas Kontis' blog on BookLikes HERE

Nick Kontis' author page on BookLikes is HERE

 

Being a child of Greek immigrant parents, it was important that I learned about my heritage. I was blessed to spend my childhood summers in Greece. I learned the meaning of family and of sharing. I slept on couches in spare rooms, hitched rides, and helped with the preparing of meals. I even learned to bake bread when I was 12 years old.

 

At age 24 I left my native San Francisco, and took a backpack and on what was to be a last trip to the Greek Islands before buckling down and becoming a productive American citizen.

 

On the island of Ios, I met Swen and Maria from Sweden. After many shots of the chalky Greek liquor Ouzo, I forfeited my return ticket home and traveled to Bangladesh and later all throughout the Indian subcontinent.

 

Moving on, I manage to tread lightly all throughout India, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Bali, Australia, New Caledonia, Tahiti and then finally back to California.

 

Without a job prospect in sight, I ended up creating one. I started the first travel agency in the U.S. specializing in discount around the world airfares. I was the Lonely Planet guidebooks of travel agencies catering to backpackers. I actually sought out world travelers finding them in various locales of San Francisco. I turned them into productive sellers of around the world airfares. Productive travel agents.

 

I never left the travel industry. In a field where people scoffed and said that I wouldn’t make a dime,  I did extremely well.

 

Going Local: Experiences and Encounters on the Road - Mr. Nicholas Kontis  Now, as a travel journalist, I wrote my first book on the timely subject matter of experiential travel titled, Going Local Experiences and Encounters on the Road.

 

Ever since the birth of Airbnb, immersing into local society and the buzz word, "sharing economy," came to fruition. Today's modern day explorers seek a better understanding of people. Going Local details how to implement a local point of learning from local cultures.

 

 

With the assistance of technology, never before has it been so easy to stay in someone's home, share a meal, hitch a ride, and to be guided by a local to gain greater wisdom from a society.

 

"Going Local" delves into the rise in peer-to-peer travel and shows how to use meal sharing apps, and other ways in which a nation's food and cuisine is a glance into a nation's culture.

 

Other subject matter includes: how a trip around the world is a life-changing experience, moving out of your comfort zone and living abroad, why it is of the utmost importance to practice responsible travel, along with choosing responsible tour operators to guide you, volunteering and why we all should give at least a small portion of our journeys to help others.

 

With keynote talks with travel visionaries, icons and explorers in the field of travel, including Tony Wheeler, Richard Bangs, Rick Steves, Don George, Judith Fein, James Dorsey, Tim Leffel, Dr. Harald Goodwin, David Noyes, Andrew Zimmern, Eric Wolf, Larissa & Michael Milne, Tomislav Perko, Tamara Lowe.

 

The great Lonely Planet guidebook founder Tony Wheeler, gives the cover endorsement stating:

 

“Many people - Mark Twain included - have noted how travel is a certain cure for bigotry and narrow-mindedness. I hope Nick’s book may help persuade people to take the treatment.”

 

As some of my luminary travel author colleagues have reminded me, travel books are a breed of their own and not interesting to most readers.

 

The average American reads fewer than two books a year and a paltry 38% of Americans have passports. So there aren't many travel books that are robust blockbusters. Expect slow and steady, not a mad rush.

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Going Local: Experiences and Encounters on the Road - Mr. Nicholas Kontis You can find the book on BookLikes here: Going Local: Experiences and Encounters on the Road by Nicholas Kontis  

 

The author is also willing to e-mail a PDF copy in exchange for a review.

If you're interested, please leave a comment below.

 

How to do Book Clubs: 5 reasons to join book clubs + 6 book clubs for July

 

Jenn presents book club's insights and some useful tips and tricks for creating, customizing and maintaining a Book Club using BookLikes.

 

Out of many we've picked these

5 reasons why it's great to join book clubs:

 

1. You chat about books

Reviewing is great but it's refreshing to immerse into the book debate.

2. Deadlines

You know the never-ending TBR list, right? Having a deadline date is a great excuse to lock yourself in the room to actually finish up a book for the book club meeting/posting.

3. You read outside your comfort zone

You will open the books you would never read otherwise, e.g from the genres you though you wouldn't enjoy.

4. You make other people read your beloved titles

Here's your chance to introduce your faves to other readers.

5. You meet people

Who said that reading should be done solo? Book club reading is buddy reading. Let's do it together and have fun!

 

Please scroll down to find Book Clubs running at BookLikes in July. All readers wishing to join and participate in the buddy read(s) are more than welcome!

 

Let's do Book Clubs together!

 

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Post by Jenn from Murder by Death

 

Creating, customising and maintaining a Book Club using BookLikes

 

 

I’m still a novice myself at using BookLikes Book Club functionality, but I thought I’d write up something about how to set one up, make it your own and maintain it as well as share my thoughts about my experience so far.

 

I’ve created a fake group for the purposes of this post, and most of the screenshots will represent what the creator of a book club will see; I’ll try to note when there are differences, and I’ve taken a couple of screenshots from a non-admin user’s perspective as well.

 

Both as a user and creator, you can find the Book Clubs in the Dashboard menu, under, obviously enough, “Book Clubs”:

 

 

This takes you to the Book Club Discovery page, and you’ll see here a list of current book clubs:

 

 

I’ve highlighted two sections here:  the first, along the top, is useful for discovering new book clubs you might like to join, because it allows you to filter the list of clubs by the language the club is set up to use and to sort the results by club members (how many members the group has), Book number (how many books they’ve read so far), or date added.  Whichever of the three you choose to filter by you can further specify ascending or descending order - an up or down arrow is next to each choice.

 

The second section, headlined My Book Clubs, shows in the upper section the book clubs you’ve created, the link to create a new book club, and underneath, a list of those clubs you’ve already joined.  The next part of this post concerns creating a new book club, although anyone participating in a book club will find handy tips here too (I hope).

 

If you click on the Create a Book Club link you’re taken to the book club creation page:

 

 (This screenshot is a bit smaller, sorry - I had to shrink it to get it all in one shot.)

 

A lot of this is self-explanatory: Name is the name of your book club, of course.  But Picture might not be immediately apparent:  it’s the small picture that will display next to your book club name on the main club page.  Image size guidelines are listed; I definitely recommend adhering to the dimensional suggestions as the minimum size; I tried using smaller images and they didn’t look good at all.

 

Background picture is the large image that appears behind the book cover and user avatars on your bookclub page.  (An example of which is below.)

 

 

Description allows you to describe what kind of club you’re aiming at having:  non-fiction? science-fiction? mystery? romance?  All of the above?

 

Terms is the place you define the rules of your club - BookLikes has provided some basic ones there in the box, but if you want to add your own, you can.  Just be warned that when you start typing in that box, you’ll lose those suggested ones (that’s why they’re in the faded grey color).

 

Club language is the official language of the book club and BookLikes uses it to filter the clubs on the club page by language.  What you set here doesn’t have to be the only language welcome in the club, but it will be the only one the club will appear under.

 

Private allows you to make the group open to the public (No) or open to invitation only (Yes).  If you mark the club private, I believe it still shows up in the list, and people can request admission, so it’s private, but not hidden.

 

Choosing Yes for Public Voting for Next Book truly makes the club a group effort, and a democratic one.  Instead of one of the admins choosing the next group read, this allows an ongoing public submission for title suggestions and a voting function; the admin still has to set the next book and read dates, but can do so by public opinion. 

 

Once you’ve completed the form, click Create Book Club and you’re now the proud creator of a new book club:

 

 

(Clicking edit again, will allow you to edit the details of the club, or delete it - the delete club button appears in the lower right corner of the page.)

 

If you’re joining a book club, not creating one, the screen you’ll see will look like this:

 

 

Both screens have the tabs across the top:  Club, Members, Previous Books and Next Books.  The next section differs:  Admins can add next book and edit the group, while non-admin users can leave club if you find it’s not the right fit for you.  The leave club button is also located in the lower left corner.  (Creators can’t leave their own creation - Dr. Frankenstein tried that once and it didn’t end well.)

 

I’ve also highlighted one of the notification settings for book clubs - this one allows you to turn on or off the notifications for new members joining the group.  Notifications for new posts and discussions is on a different page.

 

If you chose to allow voting you’ll see, under the Next Books tab, the input fields where you can add books and vote on them (admin and non-admin members alike):

 

Add proposition is the field where you can suggest a book - it works exactly the same as the general book search - enter the title, author, or ISBN/ASIN, wait for the results, and choose your book.  If it’s a book you want from your BL shelves, wait until the search results appear, then choose the Search my shelves button at the bottom of the results.  Each book appears on the list, along with a voting button and a running tally of the number of votes each book has received so far.  If you added the book, BL assumes you’re also voting for it, so each book starts with 1 vote.

 

Admins will see a slightly different layout next to each book entry:

 

 

I believe clicking remove will remove a vote (?).  Select book will choose that book for the next month’s read (or any future read, you set the dates, so you can choose several books at once) and delete will take the book out of the voting entirely.  There is no ‘end’ date to voting, so don’t think of this function as a one-time polling as much as it is an on-going, revolving suggestion list that books can move up (or down) and off of over time. 

 

As an admin/creator, once you’ve selected the book, it appears at the bottom of the page along with fields to enter the start/stop dates:

 

 

Clicking on the Start reading date and/or Finish reading date brings up the small calendar, allowing you to click to choose your dates.  Note that BL does require a Finish date and will error out if you try to leave it blank.  These dates are just a guide, however.  Make the reading time span as long or as short as you’d like.  Just remember that BL uses the dates to send notifications of upcoming reads, and moves the book from Next Read to Previous Reads after the finish date, but that’s pretty much the extent of it.

 

If you set up your club without the option of voting, then the Admin chooses the book or books using the select book search field and setting the dates in much the same way, they just don’t see the voting list at the top.

 

 

Each book (if you’ve planned ahead and chosen several, they will all be listed) has edit, delete and  show next to it for admins; non-admins just see the show button.  Edit allows you to change the dates, delete removes the book from the list, and show takes you to the main book club page

 

Now the book club is setup, the book is chosen and you’re ready to go.  From an Admin’s point of view, the only other thing you need to know how to do is, unfortunately, block members.  Spam happens to the best of us and when it does the best thing to do is quickly delete it, block the member and move on.  To delete a discussion thread or just a post, go into the thread with the spam:

 

 

If it’s just the post, use the delete post link that’s along the top of the post; if it’s a spam thread, use delete discussion, found at the top of the page.  After you’ve cleaned up the spam, use the back to club button to go back to the book club page:  

 

 

Click the Members tab:

 

 

Not incidentally, this is where you can invite new members to join your book club, but for blocking, click the manage members link.  This takes you to the membership information page:

 

 

From here you can see a list of blocked members, if there are any, and you can set admin notification for both new members and new discussions.  At the bottom of the page is a Members list, and, I have to say, I don’t know if it’s just my browser that does this (Safari/Mac) or if it’s the same with all browsers, but the layout of the members list is kinda wonky and can be hard to read; the avatars overlap.  But if you ignore that, you can see each member’s name and there are options next to each one: you can remove the user, block the user or switch on Admin functions for that user.  Admin functions include being able to delete discussions or posts but does not, unfortunately, allow them to block or remove other users.

 

The only other facet of the book clubs I’ve not yet mentioned it their link to a discussion group.  I found this a tad confusing in the beginning because all book clubs have discussion groups, but not all discussion groups are book clubs.  Book club discussion groups work exactly like the ‘other’ discussion groups and clicking on the discussion group link from any of the book club pages will take you to the book club’s discussion group.

 

The most important tip I think I can share is regarding discussions and notifications.  Maybe it’s just me, but I love the BL dashboard so much, I find I rarely leave it to go anywhere else.  I read my friends’ posts and reading status updates, and comment right then and there and it’s just too convenient.  It’s my personal theory that if there were some way to easily and gracefully incorporate discussion threads into our dashboards they would see a lot more activity.

 

But I digress; my point is that what does help is making sure your notifications are turned on for the posts and discussions you don’t want to miss.  The easiest place to do this from is the discussion thread itself:

 

 

For new discussions, you can choose all (email and dashboard flags), notification only (dashboard flags only) or none

 

For notifications about individual posts in discussion threads, you can use yes (not choosing yes means no - no notifications at all).  If you choose yes, you can then choose manual, which means you must turn notifications on in the individual threads you want to be notified of activity in, or you can use the all / notification only / none options, which work the same way as above, and apply to all comments in all threads.

 

The last feature I want to point out is one I really think is nice:  the book club page (the fancy one) collects all the recent club discussion posts and any recent blog posts book club members have made about the book and presents them all underneath the club roster and countdown.  It’s a bit difficult to get a screenshot that does it justice, but I’ve tried to, using a currently active book club, to give you an idea:

 

 

It really makes a nice one-stop dashboard for book club activity and updates automatically.

 

Well that’s pretty much it - as I said at the beginning, I’m still a newbie with book clubs but I think BookLikes has designed them really nicely, and they have great potential (especially if we get an option to integrate them into our dashboards!).  If I missed anything, and I’m sure I did, please mention it in the comments below.

 

Hope to see you all soon in a book club!  :)

 

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Take a tour and join Book Clubs this July

 

TAKE A TOUR AND JOIN BUDDY READ

 

 TAKE A TOUR AND JOIN Book to Movie Book Club

 

TAKE A TOUR AND JOIN Virtual Speculation Book Club

 

TAKE A TOUR AND JOIN Series Book Club

 

TAKE A TOUR AND JOIN More historical than Fiction Book Club

 

TAKE A TOUR AND JOIN Mindfulness Books Book Club

 

Buddy Read starts today!

The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World - Andrea Wulf

It's July 7th and this means that the buddy reading for "The Invention of Nature" by Andrea Wulf starts today! Everyone wanting to participate in the read is warm welcome!

 

You can read more about the book on the book page HERE (or click the cover on the left) and in Jenn's, the buddy read's initiator, post HERE.

 

Please join the book club hosted by Jenn from Murder by Death to participate in the buddy read and to share your thoughts.

 

Click HERE to take a tour and join the Book Club for The Invention of Nature.

 

If you'd like to add a discussion post, look at the discussion threads created for each chapter of the book - they are HERE. Once you join the Book Club the discussion group will become automatically open for you.

 

Once you're a book club and discussion group member make sure to switch on the notifications on the top of the discussion threads to stay up to date with the book discussions' post.

 

Click HERE to look at the chapter discussions and join the club.

 

 

If you're using Facebook, you can also join the Buddy Read event. Click HERE to view and join the Facebook buddy reading event. To invite more readers, please share the event among your friends and family.

 

 

 

Buddy reading sounds like a lot of fun! Can't wait to see your discussions and reviews!

 

Happy reading!

Bye bye June, Hello July!

 

Six months checked and six still to go. Have a look at BookLikes bloggers June reads and let us know how are you doing in your 2017 reading challenge. Click the blogs' headings to visit the blog pages and follow the reviewers.

 

Scroll down to view more June reading relations from BookLikes book bloggers. 

Happy reading!

Five months checked. Seven still to go. Have a look at BookLikes bloggers May reads and let us know how are you doing in your 2017 reading challenge.

 

Click blog's headings to visit the blog pages and follow the reviewers. Scroll down to view more May reading relations from BookLikes book bloggers.

Happy reading!

Five months checked. Seven still to go. Have a look at BookLikes bloggers May reads and let us know how are you doing in your 2017 reading challenge.

 

Click blog's headings to visit the blog pages and follow the reviewers. Scroll down to view more May reading relations from BookLikes book bloggers.

Happy reading!

 

 

A Court of Mist and Fury - Sarah J. MaasThe Hate U Give - Angie ThomasHim - Elle Kennedy, Sarina Bowen Talking as Fast as I Can: From Gilmore Girls to Gilmore Girls (and Everything in Between) - Lauren Graham, Lauren Graham

9  books

31 total  

9  audio

2  ebooks 

1   library  book ... read more

 

 

A Morbid Taste for Bones - Ellis Peters The Circular Staircase - Mary Roberts Rinehart Nightshade for Warning - Bailey Cattrell Storm in a Teacup - Helen Czerski

12 books read in June.  Not my highest month, but respectable by any measure.

5,332 pages read for a total of 37,037 pages read so far this year.  At the halfway mark of the Reading Challenge I've read 144 books out of the 200 slated for the year.  My second half of the year is always a slower reading time, so I feel like I'm actually right on track.

Just the one 4.5 star read this month: Storm in a Teacup by Helen Czerski... read more

 

 One of Us Is Lying - Karen M. McManus If I Fix You - Abigail Johnson Dodge The Girl from Everywhere - Heidi Heilig Underwater - Marisa Reichardt

This year, June has been a month from hell...It started out with my birthday/Open House for my daughter, then a few days later her graduation ceremony, that all went okay...just very hectic.  Two days after my oldest daughter graduated high school, my youngest daughter and I went up the road a mile to Subway and came home and a car had driven into our house.  Like, seriously, drove through the front porch and the garage...then proceeded to go through the wall of the garage into the woods behind the house, where he hit a tree.  

Anyway, my reading hit a bit of slump (as in I found it hard to concentrate on reading and listening at all), with everything going on lately... read more

 

How to Stop Time - Matt Haig Ghost Box: Voices from Spirits, ETs, Shadow People & Other Astral Beings - Paulette Moon, Chris Moon The Show-Off Monkey and Other Taoist Tales - Mark W. McGinnis The Furthest Station - Ben Aaronovitch

I can't believe June is over already! Where does the time go? I must be getting old. Or working too much.

I finished 5 books this month. 4 of them from Netgalley, oops! I seem to have lost control again and have 6 more from them to keep me from my A-list reading, but 3 are cooking and craft books and they go fast... read more

 

June was an excellent month of great books, and my second 5.0 Star read this year!
With all the activity going on this month in real life, I hadn't been sure if I'd have much time to read.  Lots of excitement with relatives visiting and a wedding... life was pretty hectic.  And then, on top of that, I STILL haven't gotten back into my normal sleep schedule.  Everything is off, I'm waking up at weird times, sleeping at weird times... not getting enough sleep...
And it probably doesn't help that I've been reading mysteries before going to bed... read more

 

If you've missed June wrap ups by other BookLikes bloggers, have a look at the following posts, and feel invited to read and join :) If we haven't included your post link, let us know in the comment section below.

 

June Wrap-Up by Tannat ->

If you've missed May wrap ups by other BookLikes bloggers, have a look at the following posts, feel invited to read and join :) If we haven't included your post link, let us know in the comment section below.

 

 

BookLikes book bloggers' previous 2017 reading challenge posts:

Book Bloggers May Reading

Book Bloggers May Reading->

April in books ->

2017 March Reads ->

Look back at the February books->

January wrap-ups! ->

BookLikes book bloggers' previous 2017 reading challenge posts:

[Guest post] Spiritual Writing: the most read genre of all

 

We're happy to welcome Nataša Pantović Nuit, an author of 9 mindfulness books and spiritual researcher and trainer, on BookLikes blog. Nataša introduces the subject of spiritual writings, and we have to confess that we've learned a lot form this short piece. We wish you all inspiring and spiritual reading. And writings!

 

All readers are invited to join Nataša's Giveaways.

 

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A guest pos by Nataša Pantović Nuit.

Follow Nataša's on BookLikes ->

Nataša Pantović Nuit's author page ->

 

If you are into “Spiritual writings” you are probably already pre-warned and have experience more than a few expectations and accusations instantly associated with this amazing genre. To be fair, throughout the history this was the most read genre of all. Remember the “eternal” classics such as: Bible, Koran, Baghavagita, to mention just a few, that have earned the reputation of the “best sellers” of all times. Whether in English speaking countries or within the countries of the East, the books that took the attention of the millions were “Spiritual” writings, talking about eternal love, happiness, or damnation.

 

Even within the ancient marketing, it was clearly understood that if a book is written by God, it stands a much better chance to win huge audience. Paradoxically, if you are a believer, all the books are by force written by God or influenced by His or Her Majesty, cause God as an Omni-potent entity must surely encompass the world of writing, yet a claim that the words are directly channeled by Holy Spirit (a messenger of God) is quite a popular one. Yet the competition within the world of Holy Spirit followers is quite tough, surely such experiences must be unique and sacred, so the other people’s assentation of the same, was at times guarded by deathly sword.

 

Within the competition of who is more “enlightened”, and closer to God, only “the best” could possibly survive. Some tradition have decided to keep this “spot” reserved only for the karmic few, by birth given rights, some others chose a complicated hierarchical process that after the completion give their God representatives the full trust.

 

Moving a step away from the Holy Books, and mind you this was not easy, there were times when only Holy Books were readily available for folks around the fire gathered to read, the written word was once “sacred”. If it is “written” then it must be true. Pope Innocent the VIII (we are talking 15the century) embraced a book written by two German Dominican Monks, called the “Malleus Maleficarum”, the Witches' Hammer, the hunting manual and blessed it, giving to the Inquisition all the power and tools needed to act against this so-called evil, called: women, resulting in killing some-say millions.

 

The Malleus Maleficarum - Montague Summers,Jakob Sprenger,Heinrich Kramer All wickedness, is but little to the wickedness of a woman. ... It is written in the manual.

 

What else is woman but a foe to friendship, an inescapable punishment, a necessary evil, a natural temptation, a desirable calamity, domestic danger, a delectable detriment, an evil nature, painted with fair colors... Women are by nature instruments of Satan - they are by nature carnal, a structural defect rooted in the original creation.

 

A-Ma Alchemy of Love - Nataša Pantović Nuit

This book was printed and re-printed many times in the centuries to follow, “the  Witches' Hammer became the bestseller, the hit amongst different classes, and was passed from hand to hand, read aloud in Churches, and on the village squares, stored in special places, with the Bible, consulted in the dark corridors of the torture chambers. The best Hunters would know it by heart, reciting it as a deepest wisdom against poor women. Printed, reprinted and translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, English, Portuguese, it outsold all other books except the Bible!” (a quote from A-Ma Alchemy of Love, my spiritual historical fiction book, that explores the 17th century China).

 

Note: Personally, I have a deep interest for this amazing time: the 16th and 17th century when the printed books became available and we finally entered the era when our ancient scripts are readily available for us to read, compare, and thoroughly research.

 

Back to the modern times, did you know that within the world of our most powerful Internet, the words that still win the most of our “human” interest are: God, sex and love. I bet this does not surprise you!

 

Writing and talking about “enlightenment”, “love” and “God”, we ought to learn our reputation either as an eligible representative of a religious structure or as a “Spirit” filled individual that allows this “Divine “ force to flow within ones life.

 

Detaching the “psychological” tools from the religious connotations is always a difficult process and it risks "charlatans" invading the space of Gurus, Philosophers, Sages, Priests, and Spiritual Researchers promising an "instant happiness", a "curse" or a "pink pill" that cure all the diseases and bring immense wealth.

 

Whether you approach your spiritual writings with the “mind” or with “heart” filled with “Divine” flow, this will not be an easy journey, yet with the "Rightful Effort", under the shade of inspiration, and within the worlds of a constant ever-expanding self-development training, working with Virtues, Creativity, Changing Habits, etc., you might be able to truly “break” into this most amazing market.

 

Giveaways!

 

ENTER TO WIN ->

 

ENTER TO WIN ->

 

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Artof4Elements (htttp://www.artof4elements.com) is a Mindfulness Training and self-help Publisher that publish books, audio, and video materials in areas of Mindfulness, Meditation, Self-Help, New Thought, Alternative Health, Nutrition, and Conscious Parenting.

 

In March 2014, Artof4Elements developed and launched the Alchemy of Love Mindfulness Training Series of 9 fiction and non-fiction books, authored by 7 authors, focusing on spiritual growth, creativity and mindfulness.

 

Nataša Pantović Nuit is a Maltese Serbian Author of 9 mindfulness books, a spiritual researcher and trainer, whose work focuses on spirituality, alchemy, conscious parenting, and self-development.

 

You can find Nataša Pantović Nuit on BookLikes:

Follow Nataša's on BookLikes ->

Nataša Pantović Nuit's author page ->

 

5 Reading tasks for your bookish Summer

It's reading Summer time, let's keep ourselves busy - with reading! Discover these amazing reading lists and book clubs ready to make your Summer even more bookish. Join and keep on reading!

 

Buddy Read Open Invite

via Murder by Death

 

The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World - Andrea WulfLillelaraBrokenTuneSusannaG - Confessions of a Crazy Cat Lady, and myself are all going to participate in a buddy read of The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World by Andrea Wulf starting on July 15th (or very close to - subject to library availability).

 

If anyone would like to join us, we welcome everyone.   :)

Read more and join ->

 

 

Bookish Delights blogger shares Summer books you can't miss!

Summer is coming.

Now, after I've made that trying- to-be ASoIaF reference, it's time to talk about books! This time of the year is all about light. easy, enjoyable read no matter if you are somewhere on the beach with salt in your hair or lying in your aparment under the air conditioner.
I loved and utterly enjoyed every book listed below and highly recommend you read them!...

Read more in here->

 

 

COYER Summer Vacation 2017 Summer Reading List

 

This is Tea, Rain, Book's summer reading list. As per the rules, 30 books to start; for every 5 books read and reviewed, 5 books can be added to the list.

For rules and to sign up, please go to http://coyerchallenge.com/2017/05/20/coyer-summer-reading-list-sign-now-challenge-starts-june-17th/.  

Join and read on->

 

 

Top 20 Best New Summer Reads Coming July

What a line up of talent.  Someone "lock me in" with no interruptions!

Check the best July beach titles ->

 

 

TOR Monthly Free e-Book

Once a month, publisher TOR offers a free e-book. Let's read it!

Read more ->

Which country reads the most? Travel guide for book lovers [Infographic]

Summer time made us think of summer travels. Travels and books go well together, right? And what's a better place to visit than the one filled up with people alike, other book lovers? Lets read on and pick your summer destinations based on global reading habits.

 

So, where is your next summer stop?

 

Infographic via Global English Editing

Source: http://geediting.com/blog/world-reading-habits